Skip to main content

Vocational Studies

Jump to: NCEA Level 1 | NCEA Level 2 | NCEA Level 3 | Gateway

Enrichment Courses are government-funded short courses available to senior students. They are designed to give a taste of future careers, gain experiences and complete certificates to build their CV’s.

They range from one to five days and are normally run during the school holidays. Courses include Information Technology, Scuba Diving and First Aid Certificates and Community Service. In some cases, these courses gain credits towards their NCEA qualifications for NCEA students.

Pathways Classes are timetabled classes from Form 5 through to Form 7. In the entry level class, the emphasis is on providing the student with an introduction to a wide variety of industries and help open their eyes to roles and further vocational training.

In future years, opportunities are added which recognise achievement in a broad range of skills identified by employers as being important in the workplace.

Topics in class work towards achieving NCEA credits as well as outside courses, all building towards their NCEA qualifications. Work Experience can be arranged to help make career decisions towards relevant employment and future study.

Form 5 Career Studies/Vocational Studies – Personal Development (NCEA Level 1)

Prerequisites: Entry to these options is normally based on being part of the full NCEA Level 1 programme. Students will be placed in either the Career Studies or Vocational Studies classes by the Head of Faculty (Vocational and Assisted Learning) based on programme suitability and students’ ability to complete the differing activities involved in two programmes.

Course description/aims: The course has been designed to expose each student to a wide range of topics, including life skills and NCEA assessment methods. Most topics will include a trip into industry to introduce students to relevant occupations such as Travel and Tourism, Information Technology, and the Hospitality sector. This course offers approximately 20 NCEA credits which hold the same value as those offered by other subjects and likewise count towards their NCEA Level 1 and 2 Certificates.

Some points to be aware of are:

  • As above, the credits in Career Studies count towards students’ NCEA Level 1 Certificate and allow a head start to achieving the required 60 credits for Level 1, and the further 60 credits required for the Level 2 Certificate in the following year
  • For some students, this may be a two-year commitment

Methods of assessments: The course is internally assessed through the completion of Unit Standards, class assessments and School examinations.

Form 6 Career Studies – Employment Skills (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: Selection for this course is confirmed by the Head of Vocational and Assisted Learning in consultation with Form 5 Career Studies teachers and the Dean.

Course description/aims: This course’s content in Employment Skills is designed to recognise achievement in a broad range of skills identified by employers as being important in the workplace. These skills include communication, personal goal setting and career planning. These credits also count towards NCEA Levels 1 and 2. This course will assist the student in becoming ‘work ready’.

Course outline: The Employment Skills course generally comprise two components.

Vocational Skills: these are taught in the class and on short courses will include basic employment rights and responsibilities, self-awareness, curriculum vitae writing, career planning, and some practical trade skills.

Work Experience should enable students to overcome some of the uncertainty approaching future job opportunities or vocational training. Students can investigate first hand, occupations of interest, collect information on careers, and assess the suitability of these options. This will also give an insight into what it takes to be in a full-time working environment.

Methods of assessments: The course is internally assessed through the completion of Unit Standards, Class assessments and School examinations.

Form 7 Career Studies – Student Pathways (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Entry to Form 7 is based on achievement of NCEA Level 2. Numeracy and Literacy is required, with a high standard of attendance. 

Although this course is open entry, positions will be confirmed by the Head of Faculty (Vocational and Assisted Learning) in consultation with Form 6 Career Studies teachers and the Dean where appropriate.

Course description/aims: The course content in the Student Pathways Programme is designed to research training options as a class, based on the class’s collective interest, trial individual interest courses through the School’s STAR Programme and have the opportunity to ‘test-drive’ career options in the workplace through work experience. The credits on offer also count towards NCEA Levels 2 and 3. This course will assist students in making informed career pathway decisions for the end of the year.

The main difference between this and the Gateway Programme is the industry courses taken are class-driven, not individual-learner driven. Students will not normally spend one day a week in industry, but three or four days a term on class courses with the possibility of ‘work tasters’ as part of students’ career development.

Course outline: This will include career testing and support as well as CV development, relevant industry required communication and safety training. The Student Pathways course comes in two components:

  • Vocational Skills covered will include career research and career planning. The class will choose from two course options which will include training and complete several work experience hours that will assist students to gain casual employment
  • Training Courses should enable students to take a closer look at adult-styled vocational training. This will allow them to collect information on careers and assess the suitability of these options. Students will decide on a personal career question and complete a research assignment and present it back to their peers

Methods of assessments: The course is internally assessed through the completion of Unit Standards, Class assessments and School examinations.

Career Studies – Gateway

Prerequisites: Open to ALL levels of academic attainment for students in Form 6 and 7 who:

  • Have a good attendance record
  • Can keep up to date with academic studies while on placement (Gateway is in addition to five School-based subjects)
  • Have a desire to explore a particular career path
  • Have achieved satisfactory English and Mathematics results
  • Are ready to enter the working world or tertiary study but want to gain prior experience

Acceptance is by way of an application and interview process. Applications are open from Term 3 for the following year with 33 placements available.

Course description/aims:

  • The Gateway programme provides students with structured workplace learning, across a range of industries and businesses, while they continue to study at School
  • It is designed to strengthen the pathway for senior students to progress from School to the workplace or tertiary study
  • It provides pathways towards future training, study, employment and/or an apprenticeship.
  • Students gain confidence and have ongoing enthusiasm for their education
  • Students learn industry-based skills and gain valuable experience and knowledge
  • It gives students the opportunity to make informed choices about their future direction
  • The programme helps to develop relationships between students, Workforce Development Councils (WDC), Tertiary Institutes, and employers. It supports the student in developing a more ‘tertiary’ type of study arrangement with rigour and accountability, while still in a secondary School environment and with full School support

Course outline:

  • Compulsory Health and Safety course early in Term 1
  • Students will be placed in a work placement, generally for one day per week for 5+ weeks.
  • School attendance will continue as normal
  • The Gateway programme requires that students complete 20 industry based NCEA credits
  • Placements will usually commence in Term 1 or 2 with the view to being completed by the end of Term 3 at the latest

If you have any further questions please contact our staff today.

Technology

Jump to: Form 4 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

The Technology department aims to develop creative problem solvers capable of producing imaginative and functional products. The courses available to students to achieve these aims are wide and varied but can be broadly broken down into Technology and Graphics.

Both Graphics and Technology are approached as problem-solving activities rather than just an acquisition of skills. All projects are driven by realistic design briefs written by teachers, and at higher levels, the students themselves. This enables pupils to produce work within their own areas of personal interest.

Form 4 – Engineering Systems and Design

Prerequisites: Students will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the Form 3 Core Technology Course. Consideration for course admission will be based on both attainment and attitude and effort grades from Form 3 reported grades.

Course description/aims: This course aims to develop students’ problem-solving capabilities and application of theoretical knowledge through focused projects that lead onto Pre-Q Advanced Engineering and Pre-Q Core, Trades and Construction. This course builds on the Resistant Materials, Computing/Programming and Graphics strands followed in the Form 3 Core Technology course.

Course outline: The course is suitable to those students who are interested in a possible career in Engineering, Product Design, or Industrial Design. It is about the integration of scientific and technical principles with creative design.

Each project will be underpinned by a folio of supporting work demonstrating the student’s process of thought and application of knowledge. A very important aspect of the course is to provide students with a clear understanding of mechanical construction and software engineering. There is a clear emphasis on Mathematics and reasoned decision-making and the course is divided into three units of work:

  • Structures and bridge building (national competition)
  • Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and programming 
  • Mechanical systems, sustainable and emerging technologies

Students will each receive a printed workbook to cover course content, typical examination questions and relevant revision material.

Methods of assessment: Students’ work will be assessed on their end-of-term examination and a portfolio of design work.  The examinations will focus on the mathematical and scientific principles to design engineering. It will also test their knowledge of materials and properties, alongside manufacturing techniques. Assessment for the portfolio component will focus on the process of designing, modelling, and testing.

Special equipment and costs: Students are expected to bring basic graphics equipment to lessons and will be required to contribute towards materials costs. It is anticipated that these will be no more than $50 but will vary depending upon the size and complexity of the projects undertaken.

Continuation of subject: This course leads onto Pre-Q Advanced Engineering or Pre-Q Core Trades and Construction.

Form 4 – Graphics

Prerequisites: Students will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the Form 3 Core Technology Course. Students wanting to take Pre-Q Graphics should be aware that this course is a prerequisite to Form 5 study and beyond.

Course description/aims: The course is suitable for those students who are interested in a possible career in Architecture, Product Design, or Industrial Design. The course is a foundation year to Pre-Q Graphics and will provide students with the fundamental sketching, technical drawing, design skills and theoretical knowledge required to successfully tackle Pre-Q Graphics. The basic aims of the course are to:

  • Develop graphic communication skills including freehand sketching and presentation techniques
  • Develop formal graphics skills including instrumental drawing and geometric construction
  • Promote students’ problem-solving skills by developing their knowledge and understanding of a design process
  • Develop students’ ability to model solutions, usually in card and other compliant materials.
  • Nurture creative and thoughtful problem solvers
  • To provide experience of using CAD and Manufacture techniques

Course outlines: During Form 4, this subject is driven by skills and associated design knowledge. These include the ability to problem solve, construct graphical solutions to problems, to model and visually communicate solutions. The course is broken down into focused, skill-based tasks and teacher-directed projects that enable students to apply and demonstrate their understanding of the skills acquired, by developing a solution to a design brief.

Methods of assessment: Students’ work will be assessed on their end-of-term examination and a portfolio of design work. The examination will focus on practical design skills and theoretical knowledge of design including the design process, history, social and ethical considerations, sustainability, materials, their properties and manufacturing processes. Assessment for the portfolio component will include the completion of class-based exercises and design brief-driven projects.

Special equipment and costs: Students will be provided with a junior graphics pack at the start of the year, including an A3 folio, A4 sketchbook, 2B, HB and 2H pencils. In addition, they will need to purchase a good quality compass, 30cm ruler and coloured pencils. Students will be required to contribute approximately $65 towards the graphics pack and take-home material costs.

Continuation of subject: Pre-Q Advanced and Pre-Q Core Graphics.

Form 5 Design and Technology – Engineering Pre-Q (Advanced)

Prerequisites: Motivated students who are interested in problem-solving are encouraged to select this course.  Priority will be given to students who have successfully completed the Form 4 Engineering, Systems and Design (ESD) or Graphics courses.

Course description/aims:

  • Develop students’ creative thinking through the solving of realistic design briefs (assessed in examination format)
  • Focus on a body of knowledge to enable practical problem solving.
  • Encourage technological awareness and impacts upon environment and society.
  • Stimulate value judgements on designs including aesthetic, functional, technical, economic, and moral judgements.
  • Develop making/modelling skills to develop a working prototype/solution (including the use of CAD and Manufacture)
  • Develop awareness of and skills in a range of manufacturing techniques using resistant materials

Course outline: The course will be based around knowledge-based teaching and learning to enable success in the examinations and course work projects. Several minor projects will focus on the development of particular skills and knowledge. The course is a solid foundation to Cambridge AS Level Product Design.

Students will gain experience in all areas of Product Design from identifying and investigating design problems, creating concepts, as well as realising those concepts in fully working prototypes.

Project and topics include:

  • Learning about the physical characteristics, working properties and typical applications of hardwood, softwood, and man-made boards. Students will prepare, mark, and set out using datums to shape and form straight and curved profiles using a range of hand and machine tools. Students will produce and assemble a small item of furniture, which will be joined using a range of frame and carcass construction techniques, with an appropriate variety of finishes. Students will also learn about the use of temporary and permanent fixings including screws, adhesives, nails, dominos, and dowels, describe the process of laminating and explain its significance in terms of strength and form
  • Students will learn how to work with and describe physical characteristics, working properties and typical applications of ferrous, non-ferrous metals and alloys. Students will develop skills in advanced machine operations using the centre lathe (cold riveting), milling machine, pillar drill and heat treatments.  Students will produce a simple clamping device using screw threads
  • Focusing on traditional design and communication skills as well as the use of CAD and Manufacture using industry standard software such as 2D Design or SolidWorks and CAM machines such as Laser cutters and 3D printers. Students will produce a working prototype made from compliant materials. Discovering the working characteristics and properties of thermoplastics and thermoset plastics and typical applications, as well as the use of composites and on-going material research
  • Learning how advances in technology impact upon the evolution of design. Students will learn how to demonstrate an understanding of the need of designers to consider physical, cultural, and aesthetic needs. Students will discover how product and graphic designers and engineers shape aspects of the man-made environment and show appreciation of the economic implications of design decision-making

Methods of assessment: School Examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination
  • 1 x 2-hour examination
  • 1 x 3-hour examination

Students will be assessed by examination (70%) and three focused practical tasks throughout the year (30%).

Special equipment and costs: Students will be required to cover take-home material costs. It is anticipated that this will be around $75, depending upon the projects undertaken.

Continuation of subject: Cambridge AS and A2 Engineering Product Design, or NCEA Level 2 and Level 3 Industrial Design.

Form 5 Design and Technology, Graphics – Pre-Q Core and Pre-Q Advanced

Prerequisites: Students will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the Form 4 Graphics or Engineering Courses.

Course description/aims:

  • Develop students’ creative thinking through the solving of realistic design briefs
  • Focus on a body of knowledge to enable practical problem solving
  • Enable students to relate their work to personal interests
  • To encourage technological awareness to include design and its impacts upon the environment and society
  • Stimulate value judgements on designs including aesthetic, technical, economic, and moral judgements
  • Develop making/modelling skills including the use of Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture

Course outline: Students will gain experience in all areas of Graphic Design from identifying design problems, investigating a problem, creating concepts, as well as realising those concepts in fully working prototypes. Project and topics include:

  • Students will be given a design brief. They will select and use formal and free-hand drawing techniques appropriate to the subject including assembled, exploded and cut-away, orthographic drawing in first and third angle projection, dimensioning, isometrics, including circles and arcs, perspective, using one and two points Students will have an introduction on how to apply correct drawing techniques. They will then learn how to use CAD and CAM by using appropriate software programs, such as Sketchup, as well as 2D design and use CAM (the laser cutter) to make small prototypes of their chosen design
  • Accepted techniques of rendering will be covered and these will then be applied to enhance the visual appeal of presentation drawings
  • Students will learn how to go about answering a design brief. They will produce prototype CAD and physical models to give them a better understanding of the challenges that this brings. They will have to choose suitable materials and finishes to create a successful solution
  • Students will learn how advances in technology impact upon the evolution of design. Students will learn how to demonstrate an understanding of the need of designers to consider physical, cultural, and aesthetic needs. Students will also discover how product and graphic designers and engineers shape aspects of the man-made environment and show appreciation of the economic implications of design decision-making

Methods of assessment: Students will be assessed by an end-of-year examination (70%) and a major design-based project (30%). The brief for the project will be negotiated by the student and teacher to ensure suitability but will be developed from a teacher-given context. The examination consists of two papers: a common core paper (testing graphical ability) and a communication paper (testing the problem solving and designing).

Special equipment and costs: All students will require an A3 folio to keep project work in, as well as the basic Graphics kit (approximate cost $65). An A3 drawing board and set squares are strongly advised.

Continuation of subject: Cambridge AS/A Level Graphic Products and Architecture or NCEA Industrial Design.

Form 5 Trades and Construction – Pre-Q Core

Pre-requisites: Motivated students who want to explore the opportunities offered throughout the construction industry.  Priority will be given to students who have successfully completed the Form 4 Engineering course.

Course description/aims:

  • Develop students who are comfortable working practically to solve problems.
  • Encourage technological awareness.
  • Provide the foundation skills to enable students to complete their National Certificate in Building, Construction, and Allied Trades Skills during their two years of study.
  • Build knowledge and develop skills in a range of different tools and equipment used throughout the construction industry.
  • Create a range of projects that builds students’ ability to select and use tools.

Course outline: This programme introduces a range of construction trade areas. Largely practical in nature, the course is based around simple construction projects such as: furniture making, finishing, and decorating skills, basic construction of a product and other hands-on activities. At the completion of the programme, students will have the basic capabilities needed to complete their National Certificate in Building, Construction, and Allied Trades Skills Level 2.

Methods of assessment: Students work towards the National Certificate in Building, Construction, and Allied Trades Skills Level 2. They will complete a range of industry NCEA unit standards that will be assessed through coursework and examinations. The NCEA Standards that are offered are designed for those who seek further education as an apprentice. Unit standards are not recognised by universities for entrance credits. A typical year will include the following standards:

  • 24352 – demonstrate knowledge of and apply safe working practices in the construction of a BCATS project
  • 12927 – demonstrate knowledge of, select, maintain, and use hand tools for BCATS projects
  • 24352 – use joints for a BCATS project.
  • 24355 – demonstrate knowledge of construction and manufacturing materials used in BCATS projects

In addition to these standards, students will develop basic mathematical skills, material and manufacturing process and material knowledge.

Special equipment and costs: There will be a compulsory material cost of $100. At the completion of each project, students will be able to take their projects home. Students will also be encouraged to purchase a set of chisels, tenon saw, set of drill bits and drivers and a square during the year.

Continuation of subject: Trades and Construction Level 2 (Unit standards, not suitable for university entrance. If you are an NCEA student wanting to go to university, you should opt for Graphics and then Industrial Design).

Form 6 – Industrial Design (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: Motivated and creative students who have demonstrated successful completion of Form 5 Pre-Q Graphics, or Engineering, attaining a mark of at least 50%.

Course description/aims: This course further develops the skills acquired at Pre-Q Graphics or Engineering by tackling more complex design briefs. Students will continue to develop their problem-solving, practical, graphic communication and presentation skills, with elements of teaching and learning taking place via both practical and conceptual design projects. Students will be given the opportunity to evidence their work using a variety of tools including Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture. Level 2 Industrial Design is predominantly product-focused, progressing to spatial design at Level 3.

The course aims to further develop:

  • Creative thinking in relation to the understanding of a design process
  • Practical manufacturing skills using a variety of media (resistant and compliant materials)
  • Creative and practical problem solving
  • Research and synthesis skills.
  • Technological knowledge focusing on Technological Modelling
  • Knowledge of Technology and Technologists and their impact on society
  • Understanding of sustainability and design’s impact on the environment and society
  • Ability to use ICT to both solve problems and present design concepts using Computer-Aided Design
  • Exploration of modelling, both as a means of presenting and solving design problems. This includes both CAD and physical model-making.
  • A range of graphics skills to communicate design ideas.

Course outline: This course uses the application of both practical and visual communication skills together with knowledge of the design process to solve design problems in relation to a brief. Design briefs are often negotiated and finalised by the student. There are three main focuses for study for the year:

  • A practical product manufacturing brief designed to focus on using resistant materials and advanced machining procedures to produce a product to a given specification
  • A conceptual product design project fusing furniture with architecture through the application of a design process and visual communication skills and techniques, along with the understanding of the impact of design on people and the environment
  • A written report that explores the process and purpose of using technological modelling throughout the design process

Methods of assessment: Students can gain up to 19 credits towards NCEA Level 2. Students will be assessed against the following Achievement Standards, with final assessment being based 100% on course work.

  • 91337 – use visual communication techniques to generate design ideas [3 credits, External]
  • 91342 – develop a product design through graphics practice [6 credits, Internal]
  • 91343 – use visual communication techniques to compose a presentation of a design [Internal]
  • 91344 – implement advanced procedures using resistant materials to make a specified product with special features [6 credits, Internal]

Special equipment and costs: All students will require specialist graphics equipment which will be made available to them from School at the start of the year (approximate cost $75). Students will be required to cover take-home material costs. The materials costs will vary depending upon the project undertaken and is largely controlled by the student.

Continuation of subject: This course leads onto NCEA Level 3 Industrial Design.

Form 6 – Trades and Construction – Level 2 (Unit Standards)

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed the Pre-Q Engineering or Trades and Construction course achieving a minimum of 50% or have been approved by the Head of Technology.

Course description/aims: The purpose of this qualification is to provide the wider construction trades sector with work-ready people who can enter the construction industry and who have developed essential transferable skills and underpinning knowledge applicable to a wide range of construction-related trades.

Students who participate in the Trades and Construction programme can go on to consider a range of roles in the construction industry, such as seeking an Apprenticeship in carpentry, brick and block laying, painting and decorating, flooring, joinery, plumbing and gas fitting, frame and truss and aluminium joinery. The programme also provides a good base for students’ who would like to enter other related areas of the construction industry such as architecture, quantity surveying and estimating.

Course outline: The course builds on the foundation skills and knowledge gained in Pre-Q Core Trades and Construction to refine student skills and develop understanding about best practice and manufacturing techniques. Largely practical in nature, based around construction projects such as furniture making and other hands-on activities. Students will aim to achieve their National Certificate in Building, Construction, and Allied Trades Skills at the completion of the course.

Methods of assessment: Students work towards the National Certificate in Building, Construction, and Allied Trades Skills Level 2. The NCEA standards that are offered are designed for those who seek further education as an apprentice. Unit standards are not recognised by universities for entrance credits. A typical year will include the following standards:

  • 12932 – construct timber garden furniture as a BCATS project [8 credits]
  • 24353 – demonstrate knowledge of and create sketching and drawings for a BCATS project [6 credits]
  • 24350 – identify, select, use and maintain portable power tools for BCATS projects [6 credits]

In addition to these standards, students will continue to develop their understanding on how to best use both hand and power tools in the workshop, along with maintenance and health and safety.

Special equipment and costs: There will be a compulsory material cost of $100. At the completion of each project, students will be able to take their projects home. Students will also be encouraged to purchase a set of chisels, tenon saw, set of drill bits and drivers, claw hammer and a square for the start of course.

Continuation of subject: NCEA Level 3 Trades and Construction.

Form 6 Design and Technology – Engineering Product Design (AS)

Prerequisites: Motivated and creative students who have demonstrated successful completion of Form 5 Pre-Q Graphics, or Pre-Q Engineering, attaining a mark of at least 60%.

Course description/aims:

  • Develop and sustain students’ own innovation, creativity and design and technology capability, to recognise constraints and to produce high-quality products
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of design and technology upon society
  • Apply essential knowledge, understanding and skills of design production processes to a range of technological activities and develop an understanding of industrial practices
  • Use ICT (including CAD/CAM) as appropriate, to enhance students’ design and technology capability
  • Develop critical evaluation skills in technical, aesthetic, economic, environmental, social, and cultural contexts
  • Develop as discerning consumers able to make informed choices
  • Develop positive attitudes of co-operation and citizenship and being able to work collaboratively
  • Critically analyse products and their impacts

Course outline:

  • The course will be based around knowledge-based teaching and learning to enable success in the major project. Several minor projects will focus on the development of particular skills and knowledge, enabling success later in the year both in the major project and examination
  • Students will gain experience of all areas of product development from identifying and writing a brief through to research, analysis, ideation, and modelling skills to include CAD

Methods of assessment: Students will be assessed by an end-of-year examination (50%) and a major design-based project (50%). The project will be based on a self-determined design problem and will result in the production of a design model that will be developed into a prototype in Form 7. The design brief will be negotiated by the student and teacher to ensure suitability.

Special equipment and costs: Students will be required to cover take-home material costs. It is anticipated that these will range between $50 and $120 depending upon the project undertaken.

Continuation of subject: Cambridge A2 Level Design and Technology Product Design.

Form 6 Graphics – Products and Architecture (AS)

Prerequisites: Motivated and creative students who have demonstrated successful completion of Form 5 Pre-Q Graphics, attaining a mark of at least 60%.

Course description/aims:

  • Develop and sustain students’ own innovation, creativity and design and technology capability to recognise constraints and to produce high-quality products
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of design and technology upon society
  • Apply essential knowledge, understanding and skills of design production processes to a range of technological activities and develop an understanding of industrial practices
  • Use ICT (including CAD/CAM) as appropriate to enhance students’ design and technology capability
  • Develop critical evaluation skills in technical, aesthetic, economic, environmental, social, and cultural contexts
  • Develop as discerning consumers able to make informed choices
  • Develop positive attitudes of co-operation and citizenship and being able to work collaboratively
  • Critically analyse products and their impacts

Course outline:

  • The course will be based around knowledge-based teaching and learning to enable success in a major project. Several minor projects will focus on the development of skills and knowledge, enabling success later in the year, both in the major project and examination
  • Students will gain experience of all areas of product development from identifying and writing a brief through to research, analysis, ideation and modelling skills to include CAD

Methods of assessment: Students will be assessed by an end-of-year examination (50%) and a major design-based project (50%). The project will be based on a self-determined design problem and will result in the production of a design model that will be developed into a prototype in Form 7. The design brief will be negotiated by the student and teacher to ensure suitability.

Special equipment and costs: All students will require an A3 folio to keep project work in, as well as a basic Graphics kit (approximate cost is $80).

Continuation of subject: Cambridge A2 Level Design and Technology Graphic Products.

Form 7 – Industrial Design (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Students must be able to demonstrate successful completion of Form 6 NCEA Level 2 Industrial Design course and will have attained a minimum of 12 credits.

Course description/aims: The NCEA Level 3 course further develops the skills acquired at NCEA Level 2. NCEA Level 3 Industrial Design is recognised as a University Entrance Course, so the credits earned by students will go towards their further studies. Students are required to demonstrate their understanding of the design process, in addition to skills in presentation, modelling and drawing through an in-depth conceptual design project.

Key aims include:

  • Developing a range of graphics skills to communicate design ideas
  • Producing creative problem solvers
  • Developing design and aesthetic awareness and appreciating the impact of design on people and the environment
  • Developing high-quality presentation skills
  • Continuing to explore modelling, both as a means of presenting and solving design problems. This will see students develop skills in Computer-Aided Design to communicate design ideas

The course aims to further develop the students’:

  • Creative thinking using a design process.
  • Practical, modelling skills using compliant materials
  • Creative and practical problem solving
  • Research and synthesis skills
  • Technological knowledge, focusing on Materials and Manufacturing Technologies
  • Knowledge of Technology and Technologists, and their design philosophies
  • Ability to use ICT to both solve problems and present design concepts using Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture (3D Printing)

Course outline: This course uses design and visual communication skills and knowledge to resolve a user-centered design problem within a specified context. The focus for study in Form 7 is spatial design (architecture).

The course looks at a variety of techniques that students can use to aid their designing and creative thinking, culminating in much more in-depth projects than previously produced.

Teaching and learning will take place via a major conceptual design project. Students will be given the opportunity to evidence their work using a variety of traditional media and tools including Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture (CAD and CAM) including computer modelling, laser cutting and 3D printing.

Methods of assessment: Students will be given the opportunity to gain up to 20 credits towards NCEA Level 3. Students will be assessed against the following Achievement Standards, with final assessment being based 100% on course work.

Achievement Standards:

  • 91622 – Implement complex procedures to make a specified product using a computer numerical controlled (CNC) Machine [4 credits, Internal]
  • 91627 – Initiate design ideas through exploration [4 credits, External]
  • 91628 – Develop a visual presentation that exhibits a design outcome to an audience [6 credits, Internal]
  • 91629 – Resolve a spatial design through graphics practice [6 credits, Internal]

All students will require specialist rendering equipment which will be made available to them from School at the start of the year (approximate cost $80) if they did not purchase this in Form 6. Students will be required to cover take-home material costs. The materials costs will vary depending upon the project undertaken and is largely controlled by the student.

Form 7 – Trades and Construction (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed NCEA 2 Level Trades and Construction achieving a minimum of 12 credits.

Course description/aims: The purpose of this qualification is to provide the wider construction trades sector with work-ready people who are able to enter the construction industry. Students who participate in the Trades and Construction programme can go on to consider a range of roles in the construction industry, which may include apprenticeships in a variety of trades such as carpentry, brick and block laying, painting, and decorating, flooring, joinery, plumbing and gas fitting, frame and truss, and aluminium joinery. The programme also provides a good base for students who would like to enter other related areas of the construction industry such as architecture, quantity surveying and estimating.

Course outline: The course further refines the students’ construction skills and understanding about best practice and manufacturing techniques. The course focuses on teamwork, organisation and management skills and a work diary where students reflect and communicate their successes. The course is largely practical in nature, based around a large construction project that encompasses many skills such as problem-solving, health and safety, use of power tools, mathematics, communication skills and other hands-on activities. This course will utilise industry expertise by offering workplace visits and guest speakers to allow students to build relationships with industry and gain practical experience.

Methods of assessment: Students work towards the industry NCEA Level 3-unit standards, that will be assessed through course work and examinations. The NCEA standards that are offered are designed for those who seek further education as an apprentice. Unit standards are not recognised by universities for entrance credits. A typical year will include the following standards:

  • 29684 – Stage 3 Project [12 Credits]
  • 29679 – Develop and use BCATs project documentation for a Stage 3 BCATS project [8 Credits]
  • 29682 – select, use, and maintain tools, equipment, and machinery for a Stage 3 BCATS project [4 Credits]

In addition to these standards, students will continue to develop their understanding on how to best use both hand and power tools in the workshop, along with maintenance and health and safety.

Special equipment and costs: There will be a compulsory material cost of $120. Students will also be encouraged to purchase a set of chisels, tenon saw, set of drill bits and drivers, claw hammer, a square, safety glasses and steel capped boots for the start of the course.

Form 7 Design and Technology – Product Design (A2)

Prerequisites: Students must achieve at least a C grade in Cambridge AS Product Design or a high D Grade by negotiation with the Head of Technology.

Course description/aims: The course aims to:

  • Develop and sustain students’ own innovation, creativity and design and technology capability, to recognise constraints and to produce high-quality products
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of design and technology upon society
  • Apply essential knowledge, understanding and skills of design production processes to a range of technological activities and develop an understanding of industrial practices
  • Use ICT as appropriate, to enhance students’ design and technology capability
  • Develop critical evaluation skills in technical, functional, aesthetic, economic, environmental, social, and cultural contexts
  • Develop as discerning consumers able to make informed choices
  • Develop positive attitudes of co-operation and citizenship and work collaboratively
  • Critically analyse products and their impacts

Course outline: The course will be based around knowledge-based teaching and learning to enable success in a major project. Several minor projects will focus on the development of skills and knowledge, enabling success later in the year, both in the major project and examination. Students will gain experience of all areas of product design including design development, design communication, CAD modelling, rapid prototyping (3D Printing), engineering drawings and producing models and mock-ups.

Methods of assessment: Students will be assessed by an end-of-year examination (60%) and a major design-based project (40%). The project will be based on a self-determined design problem and will result in the production of a fully working prototype. The major project will likely be a continuation of the project undertaken at Cambridge AS Level.

Special equipment and costs: Students will be required to cover take-home material costs. It is anticipated that these will range between $60 and $150, depending upon the project undertaken.

Form 7 Graphics – Products and Architecture (A2)

Prerequisites: Students must achieve at least a C grade in Cambridge AS Graphics or a high D Grade by negotiation with the Head of Technology.

Course description/aims: The course aims to:

  • Develop and sustain students’ own innovation, creativity and design and technology capability, to recognise constraints and to produce high quality products
  • Develop an awareness of the significance of design and technology upon society
  • Apply essential knowledge, understanding and skills of design production processes to a range of technological activities and develop an understanding of industrial practices
  • Use ICT as appropriate, to enhance students’ design and technology capability
  • Develop critical evaluation skills in technical, functional, aesthetic, economic, environmental, social, and cultural contexts
  • Develop as discerning consumers able to make informed choices
  • Develop positive attitudes of co-operation and citizenship and being able to work collaboratively
  • Critically analyse products and their impacts

Course outline: The course will be based around knowledge-based teaching and learning to enable success in a major project. A number of minor projects will focus on the development of particular skills and knowledge, enabling success later in the year, both in the major project and examination. Students will gain experience of all areas of graphics from freehand sketching and rendering to further develop design concepts, through to geometric construction, CAD modelling, rapid prototyping, engineering drawings and producing refined models and mock-ups.

Methods of assessment: Students will be assessed by an end-of year-examination (60%) and a major design-based project (40%). The project will be based on a self-determined design problem and will result in the production of a design model and accompanying presentation. The major project will likely be a continuation of the project undertaken at Cambridge AS Level.

Special equipment and costs: All students will require an A3 folio to keep project work in as well as the basic Graphics kit (approximate cost $45) or similar.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Te Reo Māori

Jump to: Form 4 | Form 5 | Form 6 | Form 7

Introduction

Kei ngā mana, kei ngā karangaranga maha. Tēnā tātou katoa.

“Ko tōku reo tōku ohooho, ko tōku reo tōku māpihi maurea” – My language is my awakening, my language is the window to my soul.

Form 4

Prerequisites: Form 3 Te Reo Māori or by consultation with the Head of Te Reo Māori.

Course description/aims: The focus of this course is to further develop the language skills of Whakarongo (listening), Kōrero (speaking), Tuhituhi (writing) and Pānui (reading) in Te Reo Māori. Students will also continue their development and understanding of Tikanga Māori.

Course outline: 

  • Te Haerenga ki te Tāone (going to town)
  • Mahi Hākinakina (sports and leisure activities)
  • Ngā Mahi a te Rā (daily routines)
  • Tōku Akoranga (my class)
  • Te Hararei (planning a holiday)
  • Manaakitanga (hospitality)
  • Introduction to Te Reo Vitality

Methods of assessment: There is a one-hour examination and two two-hour examinations, assessing reading and writing. Students will also complete regular vocabulary tests, end of unit tests as well as listening comprehension tests and speaking assessments.

Continuation of subject: Pre-Q Te Reo Māori.

Form 5 (Pre-Q)

Prerequisites: Form 4 Te Reo Māori or by consultation with the Head of Te Reo Māori.

Course description/aims: The Form 5 Te Reo Māori course aims to develop students’ ability to communicate and converse in Te Reo. Students will use language strategies to enhance their fluency and proficiency in Te Reo Māori. The course will focus on various language modes and skills, including delivering mihi to a target audience, engaging in oral dialogues, creating instructional videos, and analysing the impact of historical factors on the vitality of Te Reo Māori before 1970. Students will also explore the Māori principles reflected in the language’s words and structures. Furthermore, they will learn how to use language accurately and effectively in different contexts and scenarios.

Course outline:

  • Te Ao Taiohi (youth life)
  • Hākinakina (sports)
  • Tangata Rongonui (famous people)
  • Historical factors on the vitality of te reo

Methods of assessment:

  • 1.1 – Te Ora o te Reo – ā-roto (Listening) [6 Credits, Internal]. Students will use language strategies to develop their fluency in Te Reo Māori
  • 1.2 – Te Rere o te Reo – ā-roto (Speaking) [6 Credits, Internal]. Students will consider the impact of historical factors on the vitality of Te Reo Māori before 1970
  • 1.3 – Te Māori o te Reo – ā-waho (Reading) [6 Credits, External]. Students will learn about the Māori principles that are reflected in the words and structures of the language
  • 1.4 – Te Tika o te Reo – ā-waho (Writing) [6 Credits, External]. Students will learn how to use language accurately

Continuation of subject: NCEA Level 2 Te Reo Māori.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Form 5 Te Reo Māori course or by consultation with the Head of Te Reo Māori.

Course description/aims: The Form 6 Te Reo Māori course aims to expand students’ ability to understand, speak, read, and write in Te Reo Māori. Students will take part in general conversation with speakers of Te Reo Māori, understand most of what is said, and contribute relevant comments. Students will be able to explain and discuss many of their own ideas and opinions, using the language creatively, and they will be able to read a variety of authentic Te Reo Māori materials and write expressively for a range of purposes.

Course outline: 

  • Hītori a iwi (Iwi history)
  • Manaakitanga (hospitality)
  • Ōku Wawata (my aspirations)
  • Purākau (ancient myths and legends)
  • Tangihanga (funeral)
  • Matariki (Pleiades – open cluster of stars)

Methods of assessment:

  • 2.1 – Whakarongo kia mōhio ki te reo o te ao torotoro (Listening) [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.5 – Waihanga tuhinga auaha, i te reo o te ao torotoro (Writing) [6 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.3 – Pānui kia mōhio ki te reo o te ao torotoro (Reading) [6 Credits, External]
  • 2.4 – Tuhi i te reo o te ao torotoro (Writing) [6 Credits, External]

Continuation of subject: NCEA Level 3 Te Reo Māori.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Form 6 Te Reo Māori course or by consultation with the Head of Te Reo Māori.

Course description/aims: The Form 7 Te Reo Māori course aims to further expand students’ ability to use the language accurately and fluently to inform, persuade and entertain in all situations. Students will communicate about certainty and uncertainty, possibility, and probability, and develop arguments and points of view, with reasons. They will also learn to use language features such as idiomatic expressions and metaphor.

Course outline:

  • Haka and Waiata
  • Ngā Poropiti Māori
  • Te Ao Torangapu
  • Te Whakarauora Reo

Methods of assessment:

  • 3.1 – Whakarongo kia mōhio ki te reo Māori o te ao whānui (Listening) [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.3 – Pānui kia mōhio ki te reo Māori o te ao whānui (Reading) [6 Credits, External]
  • 3.4 – Tuhi i te reo Māori o te ao whānui (Writing) [6 Credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Waihanga tuhinga whai take i te reo Māori o te ao whānui (Writing) [6 Credits, Internal]

If you have any further questions please contact our staff today.

Spanish

Jump to: Form 4 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

The Spanish department aims to provide a meaningful language learning experience for all students who opt to study our subject. Spanish at Auckland Grammar is crucial for those wishing to carry on their language career at university or those hoping to become fluent in the language.

Form 4

Prerequisites: Form 3 Spanish.

Course description/aims: The course aims to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing Spanish to enable the student to communicate with confidence in a variety of everyday situations.

At the end of the course, students will have a solid grasp of the vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation of the Spanish language, which will enable them to progress with Spanish in Form 5. Students will also learn about the life and customs of the people of Spain and other countries of the Spanish-speaking world.

Course outline: Students regularly practise the four language skills. Topics covered include:

  • Asking for and giving more detailed personal information
  • Describing people and things
  • School
  • Holidays
  • Work
  • Talking about activities in the past, present, and future

Methods of assessment: Students sit three School examinations, testing the skills of listening, reading and writing. The final examination in Term 4 contains a speaking mark derived from tests undertaken in Terms 2 and 3. There are also common tests at regular intervals to assess progress in the four skills.

Special equipment and costs: Students are encouraged to buy a dictionary for use at home. We also sign all students up for the Education Perfect learning languages website.

Continuation of subject: All students do Pre-Q in Form 5 and in Forms 6 and 7 students can follow either the NCEA or Cambridge pathway.

Form 5 (Pre-Q)

Prerequisites: Students who have made good progress in Form 4 Spanish are recommended to undertake Pre-Q Spanish.

Course description/aims: The course for Pre-Q Spanish aims to build further on the skills of oral and written communication with students learning to use Spanish to enable them to cope in a variety of common everyday situations.

Methods of assessment: While the level of mastery will depend on the particular student, the Pre-Q course is based on five topic areas:

  • Everyday activities
  • Personal and social life
  • The world around us
  • The world of work
  • The international world

Assessment objectives: Students sit three School examinations. Each examination includes four papers in total and each one is worth 25% (listening, reading, speaking and writing/grammar).

Special equipment and costs: Students are encouraged to buy a dictionary for use at home. We also sign all students up for the Education Perfect learning languages website.

Continuation of subject: Students may continue Spanish to Cambridge AS Level or NCEA Level 2.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: Pre-Q Spanish.

Course description/aims: NCEA Level 2 aims to build further on the skills of oral and written communication by dealing with the more complex structures and wider vocabulary, which will enable students to express their opinions in Spanish on a wide variety of subjects of interest to young people. Students also develop individual reading skills.

Course outline: Topics covered will include:

  • The individual
  • Family and home
  • School and education
  • Social life and customs
  • City and town
  • Sport and recreation
  • Travel and holidays
  • Issues of current interest
  • History and Geography

Methods of assessment: There will be three School examinations each assessing the skills of listening, reading and writing:

  • 2.1 – Demonstrate understanding of a variety of spoken Spanish texts on familiar matters [5 Credits, External]
  • 2.2 – Give a spoken presentation in Spanish that communicates information, ideas and opinions [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.3 – Interact using spoken Spanish to share and justify information, ideas and opinions in different situations [5 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.4 – Demonstrate understanding of a variety of written/visual Spanish text(s) on familiar matters [5 Credits, External]
  • 2.5 – Write a variety of text types in Spanish for genuine contexts [5 Credits, Internal]

Special equipment and costs: Students are encouraged to buy a dictionary for use at home. We also sign all students up for the Education Perfect learning languages website.

Continuation of subject: Students may continue Spanish to NCEA Level 3.

Form 6 (AS)

Prerequisites: Completion of Pre-Q Spanish or on agreement with the Head of Spanish.

Course description/aims: AS Level Spanish aims to build further on the skills of oral and written communication by dealing with the more complex structures and wider vocabulary which will enable students to express their opinions in Spanish on a wide variety of subjects of interest to young people.

Course outline: The subject content is organised into six topic areas at AS Level. These provide contexts for the acquisition of vocabulary and the study of grammar and structures. The study of these topic areas enables students to progress from the knowledge and skills developed at Pre-Q. The six topic areas are as follows:

  • Culture
  • Health and well-being
  • Education and future plans
  • Community and society
  • Our responsibility for the planet
  • Science and technology

Methods of assessment: There will be three internal exams. These will assess the skills of reading, listening and writing.

The Cambridge examination is in October/November. The speaking assessment is internally-assessed and will take place near the start of Term 4. There are three papers in total:

  • Paper 1 – Listening (25%)
  • Papers 2 and 3 – Reading and writing (50%)
  • Paper 4 – Speaking (25%)

Special equipment and costs: Students are encouraged to buy a dictionary for use at home. We also sign all students up for the Education Perfect learning languages website.

Continuation of subject: Students may continue Spanish to A2 level.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Form 6 Spanish.

Recommended achievement levels: Students averaging over 60% in Form 6 Spanish and/or Pre-Q Spanish School examinations are recommended for Form 7 Spanish.

Course description/aims: NCEA Level 3 Spanish aims to build further on the skills of oral and written communication by dealing with the more complex structures and wider vocabulary which will enable students to express their opinions in Spanish on a wide variety of subjects of interest to young people.

Course outline: Topics will include:

  • The life of young people today
  • Human relationships
  • Health
  • Communication
  • Travel and tourism
  • Culture
  • Environmental issues
  • Education
  • Equal opportunities
  • Work and leisure activities
  • Immigration
  • Town and country life
  • Current affairs

Methods of assessment:

  • 3.1 – Demonstrate understanding of a variety of extended spoken Spanish texts [5 Credits, External]
  • 3.2 – Give a clear spoken presentation in Spanish that communicates a critical response to stimulus material [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.3 – Interact clearly using spoken Spanish to explore and justify varied ideas and perspectives in different situations [6 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate understanding of a variety of extended written and/ or visual Spanish texts [5 Credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Write a variety of text types in clear Spanish to explore and justify varied ideas and perspectives [5 Credits, Internal]

Special equipment and costs: Students are encouraged to buy a dictionary for use at home. We also sign all students up for the Education Perfect learning languages website.

Form 7 (A2)

Prerequisites: Students with a C or above at AS Level will be allowed entry into the course. Students with a D at AS Level will be allowed entry to the course at the discretion of the Head of Spanish.

Course description/aims: The A2 course aims to build on and extend the topic knowledge and grammatical knowledge acquired at Cambridge AS level. It also introduces the students to Spanish literary texts. Two literary texts from Spain or Latin America will be studied in this course.

Methods of assessment: The Cambridge examination is in November. There are three papers in total:

  • Paper 1 – Reading (33%)
  • Paper 2 – Writing (33%)
  • Paper 3 – Literature (33%)

Special equipment and costs: Students are encouraged to buy a dictionary for use at home. We also sign all students up for the Education Perfect learning languages website.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Social Studies

Jump to: Form 4

Introduction

Social Studies is about how people in different cultures, times and places, think, feel and act, how they organize their way of life, interact with others and initiate or respond to change.

This course is compulsory in Forms 3 and 4 for all students. Once in Form 5, students can choose to branch off into separate courses in both Cambridge and NCEA for Economics, Geography and History.

Seven broad aims can be identified for the Social Studies course:

  • Study people’s organisation in groups and the rights, roles and responsibilities as they interact
  • Identify the contribution of culture and heritage to identity
  • Learn about the way people interact with places and the environment, manage resources and participate in economic activities
  • Study the relationships between people and events, through time, and interpretations of these relationships
  • Develop not only academic skills but also social skills
  • Create an ongoing interest in the subject and the concepts behind it as well as nurture critical thought
  • Prepare boys for Pre-Q and NCEA social science programmes in Form 5

Form 4

Descriptions/aims: Form 4 Geography and History are about how people in different cultures, times, and places, think, feel, and act, how they organise their ways of life, interact with others, and initiate or respond to change. Four broad aims may be identified:

  • Develop knowledge of the world and nation within which we live
  • Promote thinking and understanding of how and why different cultures and individuals make, or have made, decisions to meet their needs
  • Develop academic and social skills
  • Create interest in Geography and History

The Form 4 Geography and History courses introduces the senior Social Science subjects of Geography and History. Students get a taste of both subjects, study topics that have value in their own right. Where the timetable allows, this will involve classes being taught Geography and History by specialist teachers. Covering some Pre-Q content in Form 4 also allows those students who continue in these subjects more in-depth learning in Form 5.

Course outline:

Geography

  • Plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes – the natural processes involved. Their effects and how people can prepare and cope with the consequences
  • Population change, the population explosion, youthful and ageing populations and their consequences. Government policies to influence birth rates
  • The Geomorphic Cycle – weathering processes and the agents of erosion (glacial processes, wind processes, river processes)
  • Geographic skills

The Pre-Q History Syllabus covers the History of the 20th Century through the lens of key questions that seek to summarise international relations, New Zealand’s political, social and economic development and elements of the history of Auckland. In Form 4, students will learn about the history of World War I, the interwar years and the outbreak of World War II and New Zealand’s place in these histories.

World War I 1914-1918

  • Key Question 1: Did one bullet cause World War I?
  • Key Question 2: Why didn’t the strategy of attrition win World War I?

International Relations, 1919-1939

  • Key Question 3: “The Diktat” How significant was the Treaty of Versailles?
  • Key Question 4: Could anything have stopped Hitler from causing World War II?

Methods of assessment: Every Form 4 student will complete a common test and or an examination at the end of every unit of work. In addition, individual teachers carry out book checks and tests for their classes. Examinations have Geography and History papers, employing questions that are designed to develop Pre-Q skills to support learning in Form 5.

Continuation of subject: Form 4 Geography and History leads into Form 5 Pre-Q Geography and History and NCEA Level 1 Humanities.

If you have any further questions please contact our staff today.

Science

Jump to: Form 4 | Form 5 | NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | NCEA Level 3

Introduction

The Science department aims to encourage students Forms 3, 4 and 5 to enjoy and excel at science. The Science course is balanced across the three main branches (Biology / Chemistry / Physics) in these first three years, and then students can choose to specialise in any or all of the three in Forms 5, 6 and 7.

The courses provide a solid background for students intending to further their education in science so they can enter careers where applying scientific principles and knowledge is necessary. The skilled and enthusiastic staff motivate students to ensure they gain a better understanding and appreciation of the world they live in.

Form 4 Science

Prerequisites: Form 3 Science. The Form 4 course is for all students in all Form 4 classes.

Course outline: Form 4 Science prepares students to study all individual Science courses in Form 5. There are 12 topics covered during the year. Students work from study guides as they did in Form 3. Each study guide contains the topic information students need to know and are examined on. The topics can be grouped as follows:

  • The Physical World: mechanics, electricity, waves
  • The Material World: chemical structure and bonding
  • Chemical Reactions, organic chemistry
  • The Living World: cell membranes and movement, ecology and inheritance
  • Planet Earth and Beyond: astronomy and Earth Science
  • The Nature of Science: introduction to safe laboratory practices

Methods of assessment: There is a one-hour examination in Term 1 that tests content from topics studied in Term 1 as well as Science skills from Form 3. The two-hour examination in Term 2 focuses on content from Term 2 but includes previously studied key Science skills and concepts. The two-hour examination in Term 4 focuses on the topic material studied in Terms 3 and 4 but will include skills reinforced throughout the year. 

A coursework mark component in Terms 2 and 4 is derived from marks gained in topic tests, bookmarks, assignments, and projects. 

All students begin the study of Pre-Q Science courses in Form 4. They are taught key concepts that are not covered in Form 5 schemes of work. Students are required to keep the Pre-Q study guides issued in Form 4 to assist with revision in Form 5.

Special equipment and costs: $23 for Education Perfect.

Continuation of subject: Science continues in Form 5 with a choice of six options:

  • NCEA Level 1 Science (a single option) – students in classes 5P and 5R
  • Pre-Q Triple Science – students in classes 5A-5D (a double option where students study all three Pre-Q Sciences. This option is challenging and is offered to academically able students keen on science)
  • Pre-Q General Science – offered to classes in 5J -5O (a single option science that prepares students for all four NCEA science at Level 2.  Students who choose this subject may not also select the single sciences in Form 5)
  • Pre-Q Biology – students in classes 5A- 5O
  • Pre-Q Chemistry – students in classes 5A-5O
  • Pre-Q Physics – students in classes 5A-5O

Form 5

Prerequisites: Form 3 and Form 4 Science.

Course description/aims: This subject is an extension of science topics and skills taught throughout Form 3 and Form 4. This means many of the ideas have already been introduced and these ideas are further developed during the Form 5 courses. At this level the aim is to build a good foundation for students intending to continue with the specialist Sciences (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) in Form 6.

The Science courses offered at this level include: 

  1. NCEA Level 1 Science (a single option) – students in classes 5P and 5R
  2. Pre-Q Triple Science (Biology / Physics / Chemistry as a double option) – students in classes 5A-5D. This option is challenging and is offered to academically able students keen on Science
  3. Pre-Q General Science – offered to classes in 5J -5O (a single option science that prepares students for all four NCEA science at Level 2.  Students who choose this subject may not also select the single sciences in Form 5)
  4. Pre-Q Biology (a single option) – students in classes 5A-5O
  5. Pre-Q Chemistry (a single option) – students in classes 5A-5O
  6. Pre-Q Physics (a single option) – students in classes 5A-5O

Notes:

  • Students in classes 4A – 4D can take Triple Science (SCQ and SCZ – two Sciences (BIO/CHE/PHY across two option lines) or up to TWO Science subjects (BIO/CHE/PHY)
  • Students in classes 4E – 4I can take up to three Science subjects (BIO/CHE/PHY), although it is recommended that students select a maximum of two Sciences.
  • Students in classes 4J – 4O can take up to two Science subjects (BIO/CHE/PHY) OR they can take Pre-Q General Science
  • Students in classes 4P and 4R will take NCEA Level 1 Science (SCI)

Continuation of subject: Students gaining pass grades in Pre-Q specialist single Science courses (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) can continue Science by opting in Form 6 to study:

  • NCEA Level 2 in any of the specialist Science disciplines; or
  • Specialist Cambridge AS Science courses (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) as long as they gain a minimum of 65% in each of 4 subjects in Pre-Q and at least 60% or better in each specialist Science course to be studied (note: 70% or better is recommended at Pre-Q for further study of any Cambridge AS Level Science course)

Form 5 (NCEA Level 1)

Description/aims: This is a compulsory subject for students taking NCEA Level 1. Students taking this course will take a range of NCEA Level 1 Achievement Standards from the Science Learning Area that will allow them access to any of the NCEA Level 2 courses in Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science or Physics.

Course outline:

  • 92022 – demonstrate understanding of genetic variation in relation to an identified characteristic [5 Credits, External]
  • 92021 – demonstrate an understanding of a chemical reaction in context [6 Credits, Internal]
  • 92047- demonstrate understanding of physics concepts using energy concepts [5 Credits, External]

Special equipment/costs: $23 for Education Perfect, $18 for workbooks.

Continuation of subject: NCEA Level 1 Science leads onto all four NCEA Level 2 Sciences. Students must have passed the externally assessed standards if they wish to continue studying Science in Form 6.

Form 5 Triple Science (Pre-Q)

Prerequisites:

  • Students must be in 4A to 4D and attaining at least 80% in Form 4 Science
  • Students who are in 4A to 4D who have not attained at least 80% in science must see the Head of Science for approval

Description/aims: This course covers all three Pre-Q Sciences (Biology, Chemistry and Physics). Due to the demanding nature of this course, it will only be offered to students in classes 4A-4D. Students sit separate School examinations in Terms 1, 2 and 4 to gain separate grades in each subject

Students gaining marks of at least 60% in the specialist Science subjects get automatic entry to a Cambridge AS course in that subject, assuming they have met the criteria of a minimum of 65% in each of four subjects in Pre-Q.

Methods of assessment: Internal assessment for Triple Science follows the separate Science formats for Biology, Chemistry and Physics with three examination sessions in Terms 1, 2 and 4.

Pre-Q General Science

Description/aims: This is a subject for students who would like to continue studying a general Science course in one option line that allows them to continue studying all of the NCEA Sciences at Level 2.

Course outline:

  • Biology units include characteristics of living organisms, cells, enzymes, nutrition, respiration, co-ordination and response, ecology.
  • Chemistry units include atomic structure and bonding, the Periodic table, acids, bases and salts, quantitative Chemistry, rates of reaction, enthalpy, and organic Chemistry.
  • Physics units include motion, forces, thermal Physics, waves, light, electricity, nuclear Physics, earth, and space.
  • Earth and Space Science units include atmosphere, oceans, and the solar system.

Continuation of subject: Pre-Q Science leads onto all four NCEA Level 2 Sciences. Students must take the individual Pre-Q Sciences (Biology, Chemistry and/ or Physics) if they wish to pursue the Cambridge pathway in Form 6.

Form 6 Earth and Space Science (NCEA Level 2):

Prerequisites: Form 6 Earth and Space Science is a course that is suitable as:

  • A complementary subject for students who have studied Geography in Form 5 and intend to study Geography in Form 6
  • A complementary subject for students who have studied one or more Science subjects (Biology, Chemistry or Physics) in Form 5 and intend to study a Science subject in Form 6
  • Students who are interested in studying Environmental or Earth Sciences at university.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 55% in the final Form 5 School Geography and/or Science examinations (Biology / Chemistry / Physics) have an appropriate achievement level to study Level 2 NCEA Earth and Space Science
  • Students averaging less than 55% in the final Form 5 Geography and/or Science examinations (Biology / Chemistry / Physics) may find NCEA Level 2 Earth and Space Science difficult.

Course description/aims: Earth and Space Science (hereafter ESS) has three main dimensions:

ESS connects systems: ESS explores the interconnections between the geology, ocean, atmosphere, and life systems of the Earth. The flows and stores of energy and matter in the cycles of water, carbon, rock, and other materials are studied to understand how they continuously shape, influence, and sustain Earth and its inhabitants. ESS also explores the cyclical interactions between the earth, sun and the moon.

ESS explores how New Zealand has been shaped by its location: New Zealand straddles the boundary between two major tectonic plates. ESS scientists, and students who study ESS, investigate how this precarious location has impacted (and continues to impact) on New Zealand’s geology and landforms, sometimes in dramatic ways.  

ESS investigates the major ocean currents that flow past New Zealand and the impact these, and other factors have on our weather and climate. 

ESS explores the solar system and beyond: earth is dynamically linked with the solar system and the wider universe. ESS investigates the structure and composition of these systems and develops understanding of the vast distances and times involved. 

Research, practical investigation and report-writing is a major focus of the course.

Course outline:

  • 2.1 – Carry out a practical Earth and Space Science investigation [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.4 – Investigate how organisms survive in an extreme environment [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.5 – Demonstrate understanding of the causes of extreme Earth events in New Zealand [4 Credits, External]
  • 2.6 – Demonstrate understanding of stars and planetary systems [4 Credits, External]
  • 2.7 – Demonstrate understanding of physical principles related to the Earth System [4 Credits, External]

Special equipment and costs: $25 for a course workbook and $23 for Education Perfect. Field work will form part of a teaching programme, but its nature may vary between classes depending on the topics being taught.

Continuation of subject: Earth Science is offered at NCEA Level 3.

Form 7 Earth and Space Science (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Form 7 Earth and Space Science is a course that is suitable as:

  • A complementary subject for students who have studied Geography in Form 6 and intend to study Geography in Form 7
  • A complementary subject for students who have studied one or more Science subjects (Biology / Chemistry / Physics) in Form 6 and intend to study a Science subject in Form 7
  • A subject for students who have studied one or more Science subjects in Form 6 but are looking for an alternative in Form 7
  • Students who are interested in studying Environmental or Earth Sciences at university.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 55% in the final Form 6 School Geography and/or Science examinations (Biology / Chemistry / Physics) have an appropriate achievement level to study NCEA Level 3 Earth and Space Science
  • Students averaging less than 55% in the final Form 6 Geography and/or Science examinations (Biology / Chemistry / Physics) may find Form 7 (NCEA Level 3) Earth and Space Science difficult.

Course description/aims: Earth and Space Science (ESS) has three main dimensions:

ESS connects systems: ESS explores the interconnections between the land, ocean, atmosphere, and life of our planet. These include the cycles of water, carbon, rock, and other materials that continuously shape, influence, and sustain Earth and its inhabitants. ESS also explores the cyclical interactions between the earth, sun and the moon.

ESS explores how New Zealand has been shaped by its location: New Zealand straddles the boundary between two major tectonic plates. ESS scientists, and students who study ESS, investigate how this precarious location has impacted (and continues to impact) on New Zealand’s geology and landforms, sometimes in dramatic ways. ESS investigates the major ocean currents that flow past New Zealand and the impact these, and other factors have on our weather and climate.

ESS explores the solar system and beyond: earth is dynamically linked with the solar system and the wider universe. ESS investigates the structure and composition of these systems and develops understanding of the vast distances and times involved.

Research, practical investigation and report-writing is a major focus of the course.

Course outline:

  • 3.1 – Carry out an independent practical Earth and Space Science investigation [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.3 – Investigate the evidence related to dating geological event(s) [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate understanding of processes in the ocean system [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Demonstrate understanding of processes in the atmosphere system [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.6 – Investigate an aspect of astronomy [4 Credits, Internal]

Special equipment and costs: $25 for a course workbook and $23 for Education Perfect. Field work will form part of a teaching programme, but its nature may vary between classes depending on the topics being taught.

Continuation of subject: Earth Science is taught by Science Faculties, usually as part of Environmental Science. It is also a useful foundation for the study of Geography in Arts Faculties.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Physics

Jump to: Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

Physics is an essential area of knowledge for boys looking to study engineering, medicine, robotics, artificial intelligence, chemistry, oceanography, geophysics, astronomy and many more. Physics teaches students how the building blocks of the universe work and gives them the potential to make huge technological advances.

Physics Tournament

Auckland Grammar School students are successful in National and International competitions. They regularly win the New Zealand Young Physicists tournament and represent New Zealand in the International Young Physicists tournament. In addition, Auckland Grammar students won the Senior and Junior divisions of the New Zealand Physics and Mathematics tournament in 2022.

Form 5 (Pre-Q)

Prerequisites: A background in Auckland Grammar Form 4 Science is assumed and a strong understanding in Mathematics is an advantage.

Course description/aims:

Physics is the fundamental science that enables students to explain the how and why of the increasingly technological world we live in. The Auckland Grammar School syllabus teaches the main concepts of the study of matter, force, energy, electricity, space physics and the structure of atoms found in all rigorous physics courses. These concepts are illustrated with current applications and reinforced with relevant practical work. Students learn to communicate effectively, collaborate, and become aware of the ethical, environmental, economic, cultural, and social impacts of physics in their lives. This course ensures students gain skills which are transferable to most future career paths and allows them to be better equipped to engage with a range of scientific issues.

Candidates who successfully study Physics in Form 5 can continue to study Physics through Cambridge Assessment International Education at AS and A Level or through NCEA Level 2 and Level 3 Physics.

Course outline:

  • Topic 1 – General Physics: Measurement, base units and S.I. units, experimental techniques, graph plotting, scalars and vectors.
  • Topic 2 – Motion and Force: Kinematics, suvat equations of motion, velocity, acceleration, mass, weight, density, effects of force, centripetal force, conditions for equilibrium, moments, centre of mass, momentum, energy, energy resources, efficiency, work, power, and pressure
  • Topic 3 – Thermal Physics: States of matter, particle models, evaporation, gas pressure changes, gas laws, thermal expansion, temperature measurement, thermal capacity, melting and boiling, transfer of heat, conduction, convection, and radiation.
  • Topic 4 – Properties of Waves: General wave properties, light, refraction of light, converging lenses, dispersion of light, the electromagnetic spectrum, sound, and hearing
  • Topic 5 – Electricity and Magnetism: Simple phenomena of magnetism, electric charge, current, electromotive force, potential difference, resistance, electrical energy, circuit diagrams, series and parallel circuits, action and use of components, dangers of electricity, electromagnetic induction, AC generators, transformers, magnetic effects of a current, force on a current carrying conductor and DC motors.
  • Topic 6 – Atomic Physics: Radioactivity, characteristics of radioactive emissions, radioactive decay, half-life, safety precautions, the nuclear model of the atom
  • Topic 7 – Space Physics: Earth and the solar system, stars, and the universe

Methods of assessment: Regular formative assessment of both theoretical and practical work will occur throughout the course.

Students sit three School examinations. The structure of the examinations will include a multiple-choice paper, short answer theoretical questions and alternative to practical data analysis and experimental design questions. The Pre-Q course does not include an external examination. All examinations are set, marked and moderated by the team of Physics teachers at the School.

Special equipment and costs: Theory and question workbooks each term, plus a practical workbook for a total cost of $20 for the year.

Continuation of subject: The study of Physics continues into Forms 6 and 7 through the Cambridge AS and A2 courses as well as NCEA Levels 2 and 3. Pre-Q Physics is a prerequisite for the study of Physics in Form 6 and 7. Physics is also a prerequisite for the study of many courses at university, technical institutes and a range of careers.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: Form 5 Science or Pre-Q Physics. Confident use of Mathematics is an advantage with all students taking Form 6 Mathematics to assist with their study of Physics.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students who have achieved over 50% in the final Pre-Q Physics examination, together with over 50% in Pre-Q Mathematics examination, have demonstrated an appropriate achievement level to study Form 6 Physics
  • Students who have achieved 40-50% in the final Pre-Q Physics examination, or 45-55% in the final Pre-Q Mathematics examination will find NCEA Level 2 Physics demanding (these students will find Cambridge Assessment examinations very difficult)
  • Students who have achieved less than 45% in the Pre-Q Physics examination or less than 45% in Pre-Q Mathematics examination often need additional help to pass Form 6 Physics

Course description/aims: Physics is the fundamental science that enables us to explain the how and why of the increasingly technological world we live in. The Auckland Grammar School syllabus teaches the main concepts of the study of matter, force, energy, electricity, space physics and the structure of atoms found in all rigorous Physics courses. These concepts are illustrated with current applications and reinforced with relevant practical work. Students learn to communicate effectively, collaborate, and become aware of the ethical, environmental, economic, cultural, and social impacts of Physics in their lives. This course ensures students gain skills which are transferable to most future career paths and allows them to be better equipped to engage with a range of scientific issues.

Course outline:

  • Part 1: Experimental methods, kinematics, vectors, force, moments, momentum, energy, free fall, projectiles, atomic models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, and fusion
  • Part 2: Circular motion and gravitation, propagation of light, wave properties, reflection, images produced by mirrors and lenses, refraction, diffraction of waves and interference
  • Part 3: Electric charge, electric field, DC electricity, resistor circuits, magnetic fields, dc motors, electromagnetic induction, and generation of electricity

Methods of assessment: Students will sit three School examinations. Approximately 20 experiments are performed, written up, and marked during each year. Regular progress tests are set and marked to give frequent formative feedback to students.

NCEA Level 2 Achievement Standards that students will be prepared for include:

  • 2.1 – Carry out a practical physics investigation that leads to a non-linear mathematical relationship [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.3 – Demonstrate understanding of waves [4 Credits, External]
  • 2.4 – Demonstrate understanding of mechanics [6 Credits, External]
  • 2.5 – Demonstrate understanding of atomic and nuclear physics [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 2.6 – Demonstrate understanding of electricity and electromagnetism [6 Credits, External]

Special equipment and costs: NCEA externally published workbook for internal and external standards (approx. $25), and an Education Perfect online subscription ($20).

Continuation of subject: Physics continues onto Form 7 NCEA Level 3 Physics, which is a prerequisite for courses at universities, technical institutes, and other careers.

Form 6 (AS)

Prerequisites: Form 5 Pre-Q Physics. A strong ability in Mathematics is an advantage, and all students should be taking Cambridge AS or A Level Mathematics.

Recommended achievement levels: Students who wish to study Cambridge Assessment AS Physics should have scored more than 55% in School examinations each term and gained 55% or higher in the final Pre-Q examinations.

Course description/aims: Physics is the fundamental science that enables us to explain the how and why of the increasingly technological world we live in. The Auckland Grammar School syllabus teaches the main concepts of the study of matter, force, energy, electricity, space physics and the structure of atoms found in all rigorous Physics courses. These concepts are illustrated with current applications and reinforced with relevant practical work. Students learn to communicate effectively, collaborate, and become aware of the ethical, environmental, economic, cultural, and social impacts of Physics in their lives. This course ensures students gain skills which are transferable to most future career paths and allows them to be better equipped to engage with a range of scientific issues.

Course outline: The subject content of the Cambridge course is divided into two segments (AS and A2). This AS course is the first year of the Cambridge syllabus. The topics studied during the AS Physics course are listed below:

  • Physical quantities and units
  • Kinematics
  • Dynamics
  • Forces, density, and pressure
  • Work, energy and power.
  • Deformation of solids
  • Waves
  • Superposition
  • Electricity
  • D. C. circuits
  • Particle/nuclear physics

AS Level candidates also study practical skills.

Methods of assessment:

Internal Assessment: Students will sit three School examinations. Approximately 20 experiments are performed, written up and marked during each year.  Practical examinations are undertaken each term and contribute towards the examination mark awarded each term. Formative assessments are sat in each part of the course.

External Assessment: Students are prepared for the Cambridge Advanced Subsidiary (AS) examination (Syllabus 9702 AS). The Cambridge AS format is:

  • Paper 1 [1 hour, 15 mins] – 40 multiple choice questions, 31% of Cambridge AS course mark
  • Paper 2 [1 hour, 15 mins] – structured questions, 46% of Cambridge AS course mark
  • Paper 3 [2 hours] – advanced practical skills, 23% of Cambridge AS course mark

Special equipment and costs: Hardcover lab book required. Theory, practical and question workbooks costs $20 for the year.

Continuation of subject: Physics AS Level continues onto Form 7 Cambridge A Level Physics, which is a prerequisite for courses at universities, technical institutes, and other careers.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Form 6 Physics at AS or NCEA Level 2 and Mathematics

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students who have achieved over 55% in the final Form 6 Physics School examinations have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 7 Physics
  • Students who have achieved 45-55% in the final Form 6 Physics School examinations will find Form 7 Physics difficult
  • Students who have achieved less than 45% in the final Form 6 Physics School examinations are not recommended to take Form 7 Physics

Course description/aims: Physics is the fundamental science that enables us to explain the how and why of the increasingly technological world we live in. The AGS syllabus teaches the main concepts of the study of matter, force, energy, electricity, space physics and the structure of atoms found in all rigorous physics courses. These concepts are illustrated with current applications and reinforced with relevant practical work. Students learn to communicate effectively, collaborate, and become aware of the ethical, environmental, economic, cultural, and social impacts of Physics in their lives. This course ensures students gain skills which are transferable to most future career paths and allows them to be better equipped to engage with a range of scientific issues.

Physics is the branch of science concerned with the nature and properties of matter and energy. The subject matter of Physics includes mechanics, heat, light and other radiation, sound, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of atoms. It is the basis for most of the modern advances in technology, electronics, and computers.

Course outline:

  • Part 1: Experimental methods, kinematics, force, circular motion, rotational kinematics, and Modern physics (photoelectric effect, atomic spectra, nuclear reactions)
  • Part 2: Simple harmonic motion, progressive and standing waves, diffraction, interference, the Doppler Effect, and magnetism
  • Part 3: Kirchhoff’s laws, capacitors and inductors in dc circuits, Faraday’s, and Lenz’s laws for electromagnetic induction, alternating current, reactance, impedance and energy stored in capacitors and inductors

Methods of assessment:

Internal Assessment: Students sit three School examinations. Approximately 20 experiments are performed and written up during each year. Problem assignments are set and marked. Regular progress tests are set and marked to give frequent formative feedback to students.

External Assessment:

  • 3.1 – Carry out a practical investigation to test a physical theory relating two variables in a non-linear relationship [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.3 – Demonstrate understanding of wave systems [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate understanding of mechanical systems [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Demonstrate understanding of modern Physics [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.6 – Demonstrate understanding of electrical systems [6 Credits, External]

Special equipment and costs: NCEA externally published workbook for internal and external standards ($25) and an Education Perfect online subscription ($20).

Form 7 (A2)

Prerequisites: Form 6 Physics (Cambridge AS) and AS or A Level Mathematics.

Recommended achievement levels: Students who wish to sit Cambridge A Level examinations should pass Cambridge AS Level in Form 6, with an A to C Grade. It is possible to be accepted onto Cambridge A Level course with a D or E Grade from Cambridge AS, but these students must repeat Cambridge AS in the May/June Examination Series during Form 7 to try to gain an improved Cambridge AS grade. Students who fail the Cambridge AS course and still need Physics for their career choice may be accepted into NCEA Level 3.

Course description/aims: Physics is the fundamental science that enables students to explain the how and why of the increasingly technological world we live in. The AGS syllabus teaches the main concepts of the study of matter, force, energy, electricity, space physics and the structure of atoms found in all rigorous Physics courses. These concepts are illustrated with current applications and reinforced with relevant practical work. Students learn to communicate effectively, collaborate, and become aware of the ethical, environmental, economic, cultural, and social impacts of Physics in their lives. This course ensures students gain skills which are transferable to most future career paths and allows them to be better equipped to engage with a range of scientific issues.

Course outline: The subject content of the Cambridge course is divided into two parts, Cambridge AS and Cambridge A Level. Candidates for Cambridge International A Level Physics study the AS Level topics and the following A Level topics:

  • Motion in a circle
  • Gravitational fields
  • Temperature
  • Ideal gases
  • Thermodynamics
  • Oscillations
  • Electric fields
  • Capacitance
  • Magnetic fields
  • Alternating currents
  • Quantum physics
  • Nuclear physics
  • Medical physics
  • Astronomy and cosmology

A Level candidates also study practical skills.

Methods of assessment:

Internal Assessment: Students will sit three School examinations. Approximately 20 experiments are performed, written up and marked during each year.  Practical design and data analysis examinations are undertaken each term and contribute towards the examination mark awarded each term. Formative assessments are sat in each part of the course to provide regular feedback on progress.

External Assessment: Students are prepared for the Cambridge Advanced Level examination (Syllabus 9702). The Cambridge A Level examination format is:

  • Paper 4 [2 hours] – structured questions, 38.5% of Cambridge A Level course mark
  • Paper 5 [1 hour, 15 mins] – practical skills, planning, analysis, and evaluation, 11.5% of Cambridge A Level course mark

Note: Marks from Cambridge AS examinations contribute 50% to the final A Level mark. It is possible to resit the Cambridge AS examinations in the May/June Examination Series of Form 7 to try to improve marks but most A Level classes only teach the A Level course to students so self-study for the examination is required. Students cannot sit single papers on either the first occasion or for resit purposes.

Special equipment and costs: Hardcover lab book required. Theory, practical and question workbooks costs $20 for the year.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Physical Education

Jump to: NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3

Introduction

The Physical Education department at Auckland Grammar School offer a broad range of physical activities as well as a rigorous academic programme at the senior levels. Every master also coaches one or more of the competitive teams at the School.

Physical Education is compulsory for junior students. They are encouraged to take part in the range of sports covered throughout the year, including Swimming, Cross Country, Hockey, Volleyball, Rugby, Football, and more. This dedication to physical activities helps students stay fit and healthy throughout the year and encourages them to join one of the many teams on offer at the School.

If students choose to continue with Physical Education in Forms 5, 6 and 7, the course changes focus to the academic side of physical education, covering optics such as Anatomy, Physiology, Biomechanics, and Motor Learning.

Core Minor Subject

Prerequisites: None

Course outline: The course is covered in blocks of approximately four weeks and aims to introduce and develop the skills of a large variety of sports and physical activity.

The emphasis is on ensuring that all students can understand and participate in physical activity regardless of their expertise.

The aim of Physical Education is to develop the following:

  • Whanaungatanga (Build Connections) – The Grammar Way = Respect
  • Mahia te Mahi (Actively Participate) – The Grammar Way = Excellence
  • Takina te Wero (Accept Challenges) – The Grammar Way = Courage
  • Kotahitanga (Unity / Togetherness) – The Grammar Way = Respect
  • Whakaaro (Think) – The Grammar Way = Commitment
  • Noho Haepapa (Take Responsibility) – The Grammar Way = Integrity
  • The benefits of being active
  • An introduction to Biophysical concepts
  • Skill development
  • Game understanding and tactical awareness

Methods of assessment: 

  • Demonstration of The Grammar Way
  • Attitude within the lesson
  • Level of skills, through individual, peer, group, and teacher assessment
  • Level of students’ ability to build connections, unity, and togetherness with their team members, in a variety of activities
  • Level of students’ decision making and thinking skills in game situations
  • Level of students’ ability to take responsibility for themselves and others
  • Level of students’ ability to accept challenges and actively participate

Special equipment/costs: All students must wear the correct School Physical Education uniform which can only be purchased from the School Shop.

Continuation of subject: Core subject at Forms 3 and 4, as well as offered as a subject in both the Cambridge and NCEA streams.

Form 5 (NCEA Level 1)

Recommended achievement levels: Selected students currently in 4P and 4R will be required to select this course if they wish to do Form 5 Physical Education. Students who have gained good grades in Form 4 Physical Education and have a genuine interest in Physical Education theory and practical work are likely to do well in Form 5 Physical Education.

Course description/aims:

  • Investigate how Hauroa (Health and Wellbeing) relate to and are influenced through being active
  • Develop knowledge of movement and skills related to a variety of physical activities and outdoor education activities
  • Demonstrate performance in physical activities.
  • Demonstrate self-management strategies to help develop good personal values and character behaviours
  • Participate in a variety of physical activities and understand how factors affect participation.
  • Develop key interpersonal skills that are required to become a good team member and develop Kotahitanga (unity, togetherness, and collective action)
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of how Biophysical and Socio-Cultural factors influence movement

Course outline:

  • 1.1 – Demonstrate movements in context [5 Credits, Internal]
  • 1.2 – Demonstrate understanding of strategies which promote kotahitanga in movement [5 Credits, Internal]
  • 1.3 – Explore the relationship between movement and Hauora [5 Credits, External]
  • 1.4 – Demonstrate understanding of influences on movement in Aotearoa New Zealand [5 Credits, External]

Methods of assessment: Form 5 Physical Education will be assessed using internal and external Achievement Standards. Coursework assessment includes examinations, common tests, practical grades, and assignments.

Special equipment/costs: Physical Education uniform.

Continuation of subject: NCEA Level 2 and Level 3 is offered.

Form 5 (Pre-Q)

Recommended achievement levels: Students who have gained good grades in Form 4 Physical Education and have a genuine interest in Physical Education theory and practical are likely to do well in Form 5 Pre-Q Physical Education.

Course description/aims: Pre-Q Physical Education aims to develop knowledge, skills and an understanding of a range of relevant physical activities. Candidates’ knowledge, skills and understanding come from both practical and theoretical aspects of Physical Education. Successful Pre-Q Physical Education students gain lifelong skills, including:

  • An ability to plan, perform, analyse, and improve, and evaluate physical activities
  • Knowledge of how biophysical principles affect performance
  • Knowledge, skills and understanding of a range of relevant physical activities
  • An understanding of effective and safe performance
  • An understanding of the role and significance of physical activity in society and factors that affect participation level
  • Demonstrating a variety of interpersonal skills to help a group or team function successfully.
  • Develop leadership skills and understanding of different leadership styles
  • An enjoyment of physical activity
  • An excellent foundation for advanced study (NCEA Level 2 and 3 and Cambridge AS and A Level)

Course outline:

Unit 1:

  • Anatomy, Biomechanics and Physiology
  • The skeletal muscular system
  • Circulatory, respiratory and energy systems Biomechanical principles of stability and balance, force summation and production of forces
  • Using Newton’s laws

Unit 2:

  • Factors affecting participation and the role and significance of physical activity.
  • Barriers and enablers to physical activity involvement
  • Socio-cultural factors and their effect on participation levels
  • The role and significance physical activity has on people’s lives.

Unit 3:

  • Health, fitness, and training
  • Components of fitness and methods and principles of training
  • Design and implement a fitness training programme.
  • Health, diet, and energy sources

Unit 4:

  • Skill learning and sports psychology
  • Skill classification, skill learning, types of practice and the importance of feedback
  • Goal setting, mental preparation, and motivation

Methods of assessment: School Examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination
  • 1 x 2-hour examination
  • 1 x 3-hour examination (Pre-Q)
  • Component 1: End-of-year Written Examination (50% weighting)
  • Component 2: Practical (30% weighting), Physical performance across three physical activities
  • Component 3: Course Work Assignments (20% weighting). An ability to analyse their own sporting movement, apply biophysical knowledge to suggest ways to improve their performance and design and evaluate their own training programme to help improve their performance

Special equipment and costs: Physical Education uniform.

Continuation of subject: Physical Education is available as a continuation at NCEA Levels 2 and 3 and Cambridge AS and A Level. These are in-depth courses that would suit a student who wishes to further his education in the Sport, Education, Recreation and Health Science industries.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: None, although students who took Pre-Q or NCEA Level 1 Physical Education have an advantage.

Course description/aims:

  • Monitor personal performance in regular exercise and relate this to concepts of fitness and health
  • From observation, examine how principles of anatomy and biomechanics relate to physical activity
  • Describe principles and methods of training and apply these to participation in physical activity
  • Through physical activity, describe and apply principles of skill learning and sport psychology
  • Demonstrate performance in physical activities.
  • Investigate the sociological significance of a sporting event, physical activity or festival
  • Demonstrate knowledge of safety issues and apply safety management procedures in a physical activity

Course outline:

Module 1 – Theory into Practice:

  • 2.2 – Demonstrate understanding of how biophysical principles relate to the learning of physical skills [5 Credits]
  • 2.4 – Perform a physical activity in an applied setting [4 Credits]

Module 2 – Understanding Fitness and the Biophysical Aspects of Training:

  • 2.3 – Demonstrate understanding of the application of biophysical to training for physical activity [4 Credits]

Module 3 – International Sporting Events and Outdoor Education:

  • 2.5 – Demonstrate understanding of the significance for self, others and society of a sporting event, physical activity, or festival [4 Credits]
  • 2.7 – Demonstrate understanding of the application of risk management strategies to a challenging outdoor activity [3 Credits]

Module 4 – Personal and Social Responsibility and Leadership:

  • 2.8 – Consistently demonstrate social responsibility through applying a social responsibility model in physical activity [3 Credits]

Methods of assessment: Form 6 Physical Education will be assessed using internally assessed NCEA Level 2 Achievement Standards. Course work assessment includes examinations, common tests, practical assessments, assignments and outdoor education activities.

Special equipment and costs: Physical Education uniform, outdoor education activities ($100), and a course book.

Continuation of subject: Form 7 NCEA Level 3 and Cambridge AS are offered.

Form 6 and 7 (AS)

Prerequisites: Human Biology studied at any level would be an advantage but is not a prerequisite.

Recommended achievement levels: This course is academically challenging and is only available to those students who are following the Cambridge pathway.

Course description/aims: This course should:

  • Provide a knowledge and understanding of the conceptual basis, structure, and function of representative selection of Physical Education activities.
  • Develop understanding and problem-solving skills (interpretation and evaluation)
  • Develop planning and practical skills for effective performance.
  • Develop an understanding of the scientific, sociocultural, and environmental factors which influence Physical Education
  • Provide an experience, which is valuable, both as a means of personal development and as a foundation for employment or more advanced study

Course outline: Component 1 is a written paper (examination) to be assessed externally and worth 50% covering the following 12 topics:

  • Joints movements and muscles
  • Biomechanics
  • The cardiovascular system
  • The respiratory system
  • Skill and ability
  • Theories of learning
  • Information processing
  • Practice and learning
  • Sociocultural issues
  • Ethics and deviance
  • Commercialisation and the media
  • The use of technology

Component 2 is a course work component (50% weighting), in which candidates are assessed in two physical activities available in this syllabus. The assessment of performance will take place in competitive conditioned practices and formal competitive games, competitions, or situations. This will be internally assessed and externally moderated by Cambridge. Candidates enter for both Components 1 and 2.

Special equipment and costs: Physical Education equipment, course numbered t-shirt essential for identification.

Continuation of subject: This is an in-depth course that would suit a student who wishes to further his education in the sport industry, exercise science, health science or as a Physical Education teacher or coach.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Students must have studied Level 2 Physical Education and gained a minimum of 10 Level 2 credits to study at Level 3. Any exceptions to this must be from approval by the Head of Physical Education.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging 15 or more credits in NCEA Level 2 Physical Education have an appropriate level to study NCEA Level 3 Physical Education
  • Students averaging 10-15 credits in NCEA Level 2 Physical Education will find NCEA Level 3 Physical Education difficult
  • Students averaging less than 10 credits in NCEA Level 2 Physical Education are not recommended to take NCEA Level 3 Physical Education

Course outline:

  • 3.2 – Analyse a physical skill performed by self or other (Golf, tennis or discrete skill of your choice) [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.3 – Evaluate the effectiveness of a performance improvement programme [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate quality performance of a physical activity in an applied setting (Duathlon/Mountain Biking) [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.5 – Students will examine a current physical activity event, trend or issue impacting on New Zealand society [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.7 – Analyse issues in safety management for outdoor activity to devise safety management strategies [3 Credits, Internal]

Special equipment and costs: Physical Education uniform ($45), Mountain Biking in Term 2 ($140).

Continuation of subject: This can be a prerequisite for various sports-oriented courses at universities and polytechnics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Music

Jump to: Form 3 | Form 4 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

The Music course at our school stands out for its comprehensive preparation of students for university-level studies and careers in all aspects of music and other creative industries. What sets us apart is our team of 15 visiting instrumental music teachers, each an expert in their field, who provide specialised instruction in a wide range of instruments. These teachers visit our school weekly, offering individual lessons and guidance to enhance our students’ musical skills and techniques.

Participation in the Department’s highly regarded music performance groups is not just encouraged, it’s a gateway to excellence. These groups, including the Symphony Orchestra, the Concert Band, the Big Band, Grammarphonics, Grammar Virtuosi, the Pipe Band and Wind Band, Concertante String Orchestra and Chamber Music Ensembles, perform regularly and strive for excellence. They showcase their talents in internal and external performances and competitions, providing our students with a platform to shine throughout the year.

The Music program has a rich history of nurturing outstanding musicians and scholars. Our students have not only excelled in academic music studies and performance but have also established successful careers as professional musicians, both in New Zealand and internationally. This track record of success is a testament to the quality of our program and the potential it holds for our current and future students.

Form 3 General Music

Course description/aims: Music is taught to all students in Form 3 through a teaching programme. The Form 3 course aims to develop four broad capabilities:

  • To develop the ability to discern detail in music.
  • To develop music performance skills
  • To develop music composition skills
  • To think about and understand how music works

Students will:

  • Learn the language of music
  • Develop musical ideas
  • Communicate and interpret meaning in music
  • Understand music in context

This is achieved through developing skills in Music Literacy and Aural skills—turning symbols into sound and turning sound into symbols. From this, knowledge and skills are developed in rhythm, pitch and melody, tempo, dynamics, texture, harmony, structure, and timbre.

There is a mixture of computer-based learning, specialised composition and keyboard training software, written and listening work and instrument-based, creative tasks.

Learning a musical instrument: Learning a musical instrument will never be more affordable or as easy to manage. Grammar offers a wide range of lessons on most musical instruments from some of the best instrumental teachers in New Zealand. Learning an instrument is optional but is necessary if considering Option Music in Form 4 or above. Students interested in music but not currently playing an instrument should seek further information here.

We recommend talking to a staff member in the Music Department for advice: not every instrument is available for lessons, and making a good choice is important.

Methods of assessment: Common Test in Term 1, 2 and 4 Guitar and Keyboard performances Music Composition.

Student Pathways: Students who wish to continue their studies at a higher level should seek admission to Form 4 Option Music and the Pre-Q Music course in Form 5. Music can be studied as a subject at all year levels on both the NCEA and Cambridge pathways. Studying Music contributes to University Entrance qualifications and can be continued at the tertiary level.

Form 4 Option Music

Prerequisites: This course builds on the Music principles covered in the Form 3 Music course. Students wishing to take this course should be actively engaged in learning and playing an instrument or singing. If a student does not currently play an instrument or sing but is determined to learn and practice hard, we will support their entry into the course.

Students are encouraged to take instrumental or vocal lessons and join music ensembles to develop their skills and supplement classroom learning.

High achievement and attitude grades in Form 3 Core Music and elementary music-reading skills are necessary.

Course description/aims: The course provides a well-rounded music education, encompassing fundamental music concepts, historical understanding, creative expression in performing and creating, critical listening, analysis, and theory. Students will also develop their ability to interpret music and refine their listening and ear-training skills.

By completing the course, students will have developed the necessary knowledge, understanding and skills to continue their study in Form 5 Pre-Q Music.

Course outline: This option Music class aims to engage students in comprehensively exploring music, focusing on various genres, musical elements, historical contexts, and creative expression.

Students will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of music through theoretical knowledge, practical activities, listening exercises, and group collaborations, enhance their musical skills, and nurture creativity.

  • Performance and Collaboration: Opportunities for individual and group performances, as well as the implementation of knowledge, skills, and exposure to various genres and styles of performance skills
  • Composing: students will develop their skills as music composers through exposure to a broader range of genres and styles. Creating processes involves theoretical knowledge, practical exercises, and guided projects using Digital Audio Workstation and notation software
  • Theory of Music: understand how music is written and organised to clarify its meaning to musicians
  • Aural and listening skills: recognise and describe individual components of melody, rhythm, and harmony, as well as recognise and describe detail and effect in a wide range of genres and styles
  • Analysis: recognise and analyse the musical structure and compositional devices in written music, describe and analyse our music and the music of others

Methods of assessment: The coursework comprises composition assignments, presentation, and performance. Students will be assessed regularly throughout the year. The examination is based on each unit’s work, comprising listening analysis, aural transcription, theory, and musical knowledge essays.

Continuation of subject: Form 4 Option Music is a preparatory course for Pre-Q Music in Form 5. More advanced students who did not take Form 4 Option Music will be accepted in consultation with the Head of Music.

Prizegiving Award: The R. H. Radford Memorial Prize is awarded to the student with the highest aggregate in Form 4 Music at the end of the year.

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Prerequisites: Students should be currently and actively engaged in learning and playing an instrument or singing. Students with appropriate musical knowledge and performance ability may gain entry on application to the Head of Music. Students are strongly encouraged to have in-school itinerant tuition or private lessons and play in co-curricular music groups.

Course description/aims: This course offers an immersive and dynamic exploration of music for students with a genuine passion for music and an eagerness to refine their musical abilities and knowledge. It is thoughtfully structured to develop students’ comprehension of music theory, historical contexts, performance techniques, composition skills, and critical listening. Engaging activities and interactive lessons guide students’ investigation of diverse musical genres, styles, and cultural influences. Committed students achieve highly in Cambridge AS Music and NCEA Level 2 Music.

Course outline:

Performing:

  • Technical competence in one or more instruments/singing
  • Interpretative understanding of the music performed.

Composing:

  • Creating original compositions
  • Notation, using staff notation and digital audio station.

Listening and Analysis:

  • Aural awareness, perception, and knowledge of Western music of the baroque, classical, Romantic and 20th Century periods, including Jazz, Blues, Pop, and Rock
  • Detailed knowledge and understanding of the features of Music and compositional devices.
  • Analyse and investigate two works from different periods/genres/traditions, examining the structure, harmony, and development of musical elements, theme, style, and historical and technological context.

Theory and Aural:

  • Sound technical knowledge of notation conventions, keys, scales, cadences, intervals, rhythm, and time signatures, including compound time and grouping notes, as well as rests and harmony.
  • The understanding and ability to listen to and transcribe (write out melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation and cadences

Methods of assessment: Students are assessed in listening and analysis, aural transcription, essay, and music theory. Composition, performance, and musical knowledge will provide marks for coursework grades.

Continuation of subject: This course prepares students for the Form 6 Music option at Cambridge AS Level or NCEA Level 2. Music is an option for Form 7 and is an approved subject for University Entrance.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2)

Prerequisites: Students must have completed Form 5 Pre-Q Music and taken instrument or voice lessons for at least three years. Students with appropriate musical knowledge and performance ability may gain entry on application to the Head of Music. Students are strongly encouraged to have in-school itinerant tuition or private lessons and play in co-curricular music groups.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students who have passed Form 5 Music Option have an appropriate achievement level to study NCEA Level 2 Music
  • Students with Grade 5 Practical with an appropriate achievement level to study NCEA Level 2 Music
  • Students who have not had lessons on an instrument or voice for three years are not recommended to take NCEA Level 2 Music

Course description/aims: Students will explore different musical elements, gain practical experience, and deepen their appreciation and understanding of music through an engaging and comprehensive exploration of a broad range of music genres and styles. It is well suited for students who have a solid understanding of music and want to further develop their performance, composition, listening, analysis and music theory skills.

  • Learn the language of music
  • Develop musical ideas
  • Communicate and interpret meaning in music
  • Understand music in context

Course outline and methods of assessment: 

  • 91270 – Perform two substantial pieces of music as a featured soloist [6 Credits, Internal]
  • 91271 – Compose two substantial pieces of music [6 Credits, Internal]
  • 91273 – Devise instrumentation for an ensemble [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 91275 – Demonstrate aural understanding through written representation [4 Credits, External]
  • 91278 – Investigate an aspect of New Zealand music [4 Credits, Internal]

The optional standards listed below are available for students with a strong interest in understanding music, research and analysis skills, musical knowledge, and advanced listening and notation skills:

  • 91272 – Demonstrate ensemble skills by performing a substantial piece of music as a member of a group [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 91274 – Perform a substantial piece of music as a featured soloist on a second instrument [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 91276 – Demonstrate knowledge of conventions in a range of music scores [4 credits, External]

Continuation of subject: This course prepares students for Form 7 NCEA Level 3 Music.

Form 6 and 7 (AS)

Prerequisites: Students must have completed Form 5 Pre-Q Music. Students with appropriate musical knowledge and performance ability may gain entry on application to the Head of Music. Students are strongly encouraged to have in-school itinerant tuition or private lessons and play in cocurricular music groups.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Exceptional students may take AS and A Level in one year with the advance approval of the Head of Music
  • Students who have passed Form 5 Option Music have an appropriate achievement level to study AS Music
  • Students who hold Grade 5 Music Performance and Theory certificates have an appropriate achievement level to study AS Music
  • Students who do not play an instrument or sing at Grade 5 level or higher are not recommended to take AS Music

Course description/aims: Cambridge AS Music offers an immersive and rigorous study of music for students with a genuine passion for the subject. This course will deepen students’ musical skills and knowledge, encompassing music theory, history, composition, and performance. Emphasis is placed on fostering a comprehensive understanding of music, spanning diverse styles, genres, and historical periods, enabling students to develop a well-rounded appreciation of music as an art form.

Course outline: Students will learn compositional techniques, performance practice, and understanding and connecting music in the context of set works and a broad range of genres and traditions. They will develop practical musical skills in performing and composing.

Methods of assessment:

  • Listening Paper in Music of the Western Tradition (2-hour external examination)
  • Practical Musicianship Coursework internally assessed and externally moderated – a 6-10-minute solo performance and two contrasting original compositions of two minutes each

Continuation of subject: This course prepares students for A2 Music in Form 7. This course prepares students for tertiary study in Music and, further, a wide range of industries, such as a musician, composers, songwriters, music producers, sound engineers, music teachers, music therapists, music journalists, music directors, music publishers and a music technology specialist.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Students must have completed NCEA Level 2 Music, or Grade 6 Music Performance. Students with appropriate musical knowledge and performance ability may gain entry on application to the Head of Music. Students are expected to have in-school itinerant tuition or private lessons and play in co-curricular music groups.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students who have passed NCEA Level 2 music or have an appropriate achievement level to study NCEA Level 3 Music
  • Students who hold Grade 6 Music Performance and Theory certificates have an appropriate achievement level to study this course
  • Students who do not play an instrument or sing at Grade 6 level or higher are not recommended to take this course

Course description/aims: The NCEA Level 3 Music course caters to students with a strong musical foundation, providing an extensive exploration of advanced music theory, composition, performance, listening analysis and aural transcription. Through practical and theoretical activities, students will deepen their skills and knowledge, showcasing their abilities as soloists and ensemble members, composing original music, analysing diverse musical works, and reinforcing their understanding of music theory. It aims to equip students with the necessary skills and knowledge for tertiary-level music studies or careers in the music industry, serving as a solid foundation for future academic or professional pathways in music.

Course outline and methods of assessment:

  • 91416 – Perform two programmes of music as a featured soloist [8 Credits, Internal]
  • 91419 – Communicate musical intention by composing three original pieces of music [8 Credits, Internal]
  • 91420 – Integrate aural skills into written representation [4 Credits, External]
  • 91421 – Demonstrate understanding of harmonic and tonal conventions in a range of music scores [4 credits, External]
  • 91425 – Research a music topic [6 Credits, Internal]

The optional standards listed below are available for students with a strong interest in understanding music, research and analysis skills, musical knowledge, and advanced listening and notation skills:

  • 91418 – Demonstrate ensemble skills by performing two substantial pieces of music as a member of a group [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 91417 – Perform a programme of music as a featured soloist on a second instrument [4 Credits, Internal]

Continuation of subject: This course prepares students for tertiary study in Music and, further, a wide range of industries, such as musicians, composers, songwriters, music producers, sound engineers, music teachers, music therapists, music journalists, music directors, music publisher and a music technology specialist.

Form 7 (A2)

Prerequisites: Student must have achieved an A, B or C grade in AS Music with Components 1 and 2. Students are expected to have in-school itinerant tuition or private lessons and play in extracurricular music groups.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students who have gained an A, B or C grade in AS Music have an appropriate achievement level to study A2 Music
  • Students who have not completed AS Music Components 1 and 2 are ineligible to enter the A2 Music course

Course descriptions/aims: This course enables students to enhance their musical knowledge and skills within a broader cultural framework. Through composing and performing, students will deepen their understanding of music and develop their creative and interpretative abilities. They will learn to communicate their musical understanding effectively, supporting their judgments with well-researched evidence and analytical arguments.

This course prepares students for advanced studies in music or related disciplines at the university level. Equipping students with the necessary skills and knowledge will prepare them to excel in their musical pursuits and lay a strong foundation for future academic and professional endeavours.

Course outline: This course focuses on developing students’ skills in attentive and responsive listening, understanding the underlying processes in music, effectively communicating knowledge and musical insights, and demonstrating technical proficiency and interpretive competence in performance and composition.

Methods of assessments: Students will be assessed externally in their two Practical Musicianship Coursework components. There are no school-based examinations for this course.

  • Component 3: Extended Performance (15-20 minutes performance and a research report)
  • Component 4: Extended Composition (two contrasting compositions and a research report)
  • Component 5: Investigating Music (essay and a reflective statement)

Continuation of subject: This course prepares students for tertiary study in Music and, further, a wide range of industries, such as musicians, composers, songwriters, music producers, sound engineers, music teachers, music therapists, music journalists, music directors, music publisher and a music technology specialist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Media Studies

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3)

Prerequisites: Form 7 Media Studies is a course that is suitable as:

  • A complementary subject to students who intend to study English in Form 7; or
  • A replacement subject for students who have successfully studied English in Form 6, but are interested in focusing on media

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 55% in Form 6 Humanities subject School examinations have an appropriate achievement level to study NCEA Level 3 Media Studies
  • Students averaging 45-55% in Form 6 Humanities subject School examinations may find NCEA Level 3 Media Studies difficult
  • Students averaging under 45% in Form 6 Humanities subject School examinations are not recommended to take NCEA Level 3 Media Studies
  • Students who have passed two or more essay-based standards in English or History or Classical Studies are more likely to have an appropriate achievement level to study NCEA Level 3 Media Studies

Course description/aims: The following three strands are used to structure the learning objectives:

Media in Society: Students explore how the media operates within societal contexts and how they themselves can understand the place of media in society. These societal contexts can include historical, economic, social, cultural, and political perspectives. Students learn to understand their own relationship with the media in order to act as critical, active, informed and responsible citizens.

Reading Media Texts: Students study, and apply, media language and media texts. The analysis of the content of media texts, using appropriate media terminology, gives students the ability to understand how meanings are created in texts. Students look at groups of texts (genre), structures of texts (narrative), and they learn the skills of close reading so they can respond to the products of others as well as their own.

Media Production: Students learn to make media products that can entertain, inform, and challenge. They explore, develop, and communicate ideas through the development of their skills in the use of media technology. In the process, they use language, symbols, and structures to create meaning. In reflecting on their own and others’ products, students develop their production skills.

Course outline: This Media option seeks to give students the tools necessary for a career in the media. It also seeks to develop perceptive and critical students who will question the media around them and become ‘active’ global citizens. Students will learn about industry practices, how meaning is constructed by those who report the news, the role that advertising plays in New Zealand, and how to construct their own media product.

Methods of assessment: NCEA Level 3 Media Studies has six achievement standards:

  • 3.1 – Demonstrate understanding of an aspect of a media industry [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.3 – Demonstrate understanding of the media representation of an aspect of New Zealand culture or society [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate understanding of a relationship between a media genre and society [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Produce a design for a media product that meets the requirements of a brief [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.6 – Produce a media product to meet the requirements of a brief [6 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.7 – Demonstrate development in the media [3 Credits, Internal]

Continuation of subject: There may be a cost associated with accessing editing programmes. Further information will be provided at the outset of the course.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.