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Mathematics

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

The Mathematics Department is one of the central departments to a student’s education at Auckland Grammar School. Students in each year are divided by form level depending on their abilities. Gifted and talented students can choose to be placed in the accelerated programme, which consist of the top two or three classes in Forms 3 to 6.

Form 4

Prerequisites: Form 3 Mathematics.

Course description/aims: The course aims to revise and develop the basics of Form 3 work in the expectation of getting close to Pre-Q and NCEA Level 1 standard, especially in Algebra, so that the students are well prepared for Mathematics after Pre-Q and NCEA Level 1. This course is an introduction course to Pre-Q and the work covered consolidates the essential skills required to continue with Pre-Q Mathematics. Learning these key skills and tools are essential for progressing to Pre-Q.

Course outline: The Form 4 Mathematics course reinforces and extends Form 3 work in Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry. New topics include:

  • Linear and quadratic relations and their graphs
  • Simultaneous equations
  • Right-angled triangle trigonometry
  • Transformation geometry with enlargement/similarity
  • Graphs of trig functions
  • Statistics
  • Probability
  • Symmetry and Constructions

Methods of assessment: Common tests and three School examinations.

Special equipment and costs: A calculator, a ruler, protractor and a compass. Costs will only occur if students enter competitions. Optional cost – the continuation of Maths Buddy. All Form 4 students are encouraged to continue with their subscription.

Continuation of subject: The course leads on to Form 5 Pre-Q Mathematics and ultimately to Form 7 Cambridge A2 or NCEA Level 3 courses.

Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Prerequisites: Form 3 and 4 Mathematics. A cohort of students, primarily from 4P and 4R, will be selected to study this course.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students with a mark of 35% or more in the final Form 4 examination have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 5 NCEA and gain Numeracy
  • Students with a mark between 25-35% in the final Form 4 examination may find aspects of Form 5 NCEA challenging
  • Students with a mark below 25% in the final Form 4 examination may find the Form 5 NCEA course difficult

Course description/aims: The aim of the course is to introduce and develop basic mathematical skills, concepts, and understanding in the Mathematical strands of Processes, Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics . The course objectives are that the candidate will be expected to:

  • Apply mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings in real and simulated problems
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques in problem solving
  • Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and systematically
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate mathematical ideas

Upon the successful completion of the course of study, students may study Form 6 NCEA Level 2 Mathematics. However, for some students, this is a terminating course and will provide credits towards Numeracy only.

Course outline:

Arithmetic – Number [4 Credits, Internal]

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • Ratio, proportion and rates
  • Primes, factors, multiples, powers and roots
  • Integer and fractional powers applied to numbers
  • Fractions, decimals and percentages
  • Rounding with decimal places and significant figures, degrees of accuracy including standard form

Algebra I

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • Factorising and expanding
  • Simplifying algebraic expressions involving exponents
  • Substituting values into formulae
  • Manipulating and simplifying expressions
  • Rearranging formulae

Algebra II

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • Solving linear equations and inequations
  • Solving quadratic equations
  • Solving simple equations involving exponents
  • Solving pairs of simultaneous linear equations with the same two unknowns

Measurement (time, units, perimeter, area and volume) [3 Credits, Internal] 

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • Perimeter, area and surface area
  • Volume
  • Time and metric units

Statistics [4 Credits, Internal]

Students will be expected to be familiar with the statistical enquiry cycle which involves:

  • Investigating data that has been collected from a survey situation
  • Posing an appropriate comparison question using a given multivariate data set
  • Selecting and using appropriate data display(s)
  • Giving summary stats such as the summary values (minimum, maximum, median, quartiles and percentiles)
  • Discussing features of distributions comparatively, such as shape, middle 50%, shift, overlap, spread, unusual or interesting features and outliers
  • Communicating findings, such as informal inference and supporting evidence, in a conclusion

Linear Graphs [3 Credits, Internal]

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • Applying linear algebra in solving problems
  • Developing patterns to problems in context

Geometry [3 Credits, Internal]

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • 2D Co-ordinate systems
  • Scale drawings
  • Bearings
  • Locus
  • Construction
  • Nets
  • 2D representation of 3D objects

Trigonometry [3 Credits, Internal]

Students will be expected to be familiar with methods related to:

  • Pythagoras’ Theorem
  • Trigonometric ratios
  • Similar shapes
  • Measuring appropriately

Special equipment and costs: A protractor, compasses, ruler and a scientific calculator of about Casio fx-standard.  A graphical calculator (Casio fx-9750G PLUS) is permissible and highly recommended. Achievement Standard Workbooks may be required for purchase (approximately $45).

Continuation of subject: Primarily, this subject is a terminating course. However, a successful completion of the course may give students an opportunity to proceed with Mathematics courses on offer at Form 6 NCEA Level 2 at the discretion of the Head of Department. To be considered for Level 2 Mathematics, students must successfully complete the Term 4 Algebra examination plus any of the other standards totalling at least 12 credits.

Form 5 (Pre-Q Advanced)

Prerequisites: Forms 3 and 4 Mathematics. Students need to perform above 50% in Form 4.

Course description/aims: The aim of the course is to introduce and develop basic mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings in the Mathematical Processes, Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics curriculum strands. This course will prepare students for the Pre-Q Mathematics Advanced examination.

  • Apply mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings to familiar and unfamiliar problems arising in real and simulated situations
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques in problem solving
  • Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and systematically
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate mathematical ideas

At the conclusion of this course of study, a student will be well prepared to continue his studies in Form 6 Cambridge AS Mathematics. 

Course outline: Topics covered will include:

  • Number
  • Algebra and graphs
  • Geometry
  • Mensuration
  • Co-ordinate Geometry
  • Trigonometry
  • Vectors
  • An introduction to Calculus
  • Probability
  • Statistics

Methods of assessment: Students presenting for Pre-Q Mathematics Advanced will be assessed on the basis of a single final examination, assessed in Term 4.

Special equipment and costs: A protractor, compass, ruler and a scientific calculator of about Casio FX- standard. Casio fx-991ES or fx-115ES are recommended (no graphical calculators are permitted).

Continuation of subject: The successful completion of the course will prepare students well for the courses on offer at Forms 6 and 7, Cambridge and NCEA courses.

Form 5 (Pre-Q Core)

Prerequisites: Form 3 and 4 Mathematics. Students need to perform between 35% and 50% in Form 4.

Course description/aims: The aim of the course is to introduce and develop basic mathematical skills, concepts, and understanding in the Mathematical strands of Processes, Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics.  This course will prepare students for the Pre-Q Mathematics Core examination. The course objectives are that the candidate will be expected to:

  • Apply mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings in real and simulated problems
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques in problem solving
  • Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and systematically
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate mathematical ideas

At the successful conclusion of the course of study, a student will be well prepared to continue his studies in Form 6 NCEA Level 2 Mathematics.

Course outline: Topics covered will include:

  • Number
  • Algebra and graphs
  • Geometry
  • Mensuration
  • Co-ordinate Geometry
  • Trigonometry
  • Vectors
  • An introduction to Calculus
  • Probability
  • Statistics

Methods of assessments: Students presenting for Pre-Q Mathematics Core will be assessed on the basis of a single final examination, assessed in Term 4. Students will also complete three internally-assessed NCEA Level 1 standards during the year, worth a total of 10 credits.

Special equipment and costs: A protractor, compasses, ruler and a scientific calculator of about Casio fx-standard. Permissible calculators are Casio fx-991ES and fx-115ES (no graphical calculators are permitted).

Continuation of subject: The successful completion of the course will prepare students for all Mathematics courses on offer at NCEA Levels at Forms 6 and 7.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Prerequisites: Students should have gained a minimum of 10 credits in NCEA Level 1 or Pre-Q Core.

Course description/aims: The aim of the NCEA Level 2 Mathematics course is to introduce and develop basic mathematical skills, concepts, and understanding in the Mathematical Processes, Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics curriculum strands. 

This course will serve as an introduction to the NCEA Level 3 Mathematics courses offered in Form 7. 

Students will be expected to:

  • Apply mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings to familiar and unfamiliar problems arising in real and simulated situations
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques in problem solving
  • Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and systematically
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate mathematical ideas

Course outline: The course content will include six to eight topics, to be selected from the list below:

  • Systems of equations
  • Simulations
  • Networks
  • Questionnaires
  • Co-ordinate Geometry
  • Inference
  • Graphical methods
  • Algebra
  • Graphs
  • Probability and Statistics
  • Calculus
  • Trigonometry

Methods of assessment: The NCEA Level 2 Mathematics course is assessed by internal and external Achievement Standards. A common testing programme will operate throughout the year and there will be three School examinations.

Students will also be assessed by internal Achievement Standards as Common Assessment Tasks (CATs), to be selected from the following list:

  • 2.1 – apply co-ordinate geometry methods in solving problems [2 Credits]
  • 2.2 – apply graphical models in solving problems [4 Credits]
  • 2.4 – apply trigonometric relationships in solving problems [3 Credits]
  • 2.5 – apply network methods in solving problems [2 Credits]
  • 2.8 – design a questionnaire [3 Credits]
  • 2.9 – use statistical methods to make an inference [4 Credits]
  • 2.13 – investigate a situation involving elements of chance using a simulation [2 Credits]
  • 2.14 – apply systems of equations in solving problems [2 Credits]

Students presenting for NCEA Level 2 Mathematics will be assessed on the basis of a three-hour external examination. This examination will contain 3 booklets, each one examining an externally-examined Achievement Standard as follows: 

  • 2.6 – apply algebraic methods in solving problems [4 Credits]
  • 2.7 – apply calculus methods in solving problems [5 Credits]
  • 2.12 – apply probability methods in solving problems [4 Credits]

Special equipment and costs: A protractor, compass, ruler and a scientific calculator of about Casio FX-standard. A graphical calculator (Casio fx-9750G PLUS) is permissible and highly recommended.  Achievement Standard Workbooks may be required for purchase (approximately $50).

Continuation of subject: Successful completion of this course will prepare students for NCEA Level 3 Mathematics courses offered at Form 7.

Form 6 (AS):

Recent experience shows that Pre-Q Mathematics provides good preparation for Cambridge AS Mathematics.

  • Students with a mark of 55% in Pre-Q Advancing Mathematics are capable of scoring at least a C grade in Form 6 Cambridge AS Level
  • The majority of students scoring between 45% and 55% in Pre-Q Advancing Mathematics continue on to Form 6 Cambridge AS Level and pass, achieving the University Entrance Numeracy requirement in Form 6

Cambridge AS Mathematics in Form 6 is also available to students who have studied Pre-Q Core Mathematics.

Course description/aims: The aim of the course is to introduce and develop basic mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings in the Mathematical Processes, Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics curriculum strands. This course will cover all aspects of the Cambridge AS course and will serve as an introduction to A2 Pure Mathematics, Statistics or Mechanics courses. The course objectives are that candidates will be expected to:

  • Apply mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings to familiar and unfamiliar problems arising in real and simulated situations
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques in problem solving
  • Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and systematically
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate mathematical ideas

Course outline:

  • Algebra (surds and indices)
  • Graphs
  • Quadratic equations
  • Functions and notations
  • Binomial expansion
  • Statistics I (data display and graphs)
  • Arrangements (perms and combs)
  • Co-ordinate Geometry
  • Calculus I (differentiation)
  • Trigonometry I (radians and circular measure)
  • Trigonometry II (graphs, identities and equations)
  • Probability
  • Calculus II (integration) 
  • Random variables
  • Normal distribution
  • Sequences and series

Methods of assessment: A common testing programme will exist throughout the year. Students will also sit three examinations:

  • Term 1 progress examination [1 hour]
  • Term 2 examination [2 hours]
  • Term 3 final examination [3 hours]

Students presenting for AS Mathematics will be assessed on the basis of two external examinations:

  • Paper P1 9709/ [1 hour, 50 mins] – Pure Mathematics paper sat in late October/early November
  • Paper S1 9709/5 [1 hour, 15 mins] – Statistics paper sat in late October/early November

Special equipment and costs: A protractor, compass, ruler and a scientific calculator of about Casio FX- standard (Casio fx-991ES Plus is recommended).

Continuation of subject: The course will prepare students well for all the Cambridge courses on offer at Form 7.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: The NCEA Level 3 Maths course is differentiated. Students will be placed in the appropriate class, based on performances in the Form 6 Level 2 Mathematics courses. It is possible to combine Form 7 Level 3 Mathematics and Form 7 Statistics courses.

Course description/aims: All classes will provide students with a solid grounding in mathematical skills, concepts and understanding in the Mathematical Processes, Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics curriculum strands. 

Most students will study courses that prepare them for university-level courses requiring a mixture of Algebra, Probability and Calculus. Level 3 Mathematics students will be expected to:

  • Apply mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings to familiar and unfamiliar problems arising in real and simulated situations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques in problem-solving.
  • Demonstrate the ability to reason logically and systematically
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate mathematical ideas.

Course outline: The course will include five to six topics to be selected from the below:

  • Conics
  • Linear programming
  • Trigonometry
  • Algebra and complex numbers
  • Differentiation 
  • Integration 
  • Probability distributions 
  • Simultaneous equations
  • Systems of equations 
  • Time series
  • Bivariate data
  • Inference
  • Critical paths analysis

Methods of assessment: The NCEA Level 3 Mathematics course is assessed by internal and external Achievement Standards. Class tests and a common testing programme will operate throughout the year, along with three School examinations. Grades will be determined by:

  • AS 91573 – apply the geometry of conic sections in solving problems [Term 3]
  • AS 91574 – apply linear programming methods in solving problems [3 Credits, Internal]
  • AS 91575 – apply trigonometric methods in solving problems [Term 2]
  • AS 91576 – use critical path analysis in solving problems [2 Credits, Internal]
  • AS 91580 – investigate time series data [4 Credits, Internal]
  • AS 91581 – investigate bivariate measurement data [4 Credits, Internal]
  • AS 91582 – use statistical methods to make an inference [4 Credits, Internal]
  • AS 91587 – apply systems of simultaneous equations in solving problems [3 Credits, Internal]

Students sitting NCEA Level 3 Mathematics will be assessed on the basis of a three-hour external examination containing external Achievement Standards: 

  • AS 91577 – apply algebra of complex numbers in solving problems
  • AS 91578 – apply differentiation methods in solving problems
  • AS 91579 – apply integration methods in solving problems
  • AS 91586 – apply probability distributions in solving problems

Special equipment and costs: A scientific or graphical calculator (a graphical calculator is highly recommended). Achievement Standard Workbooks may be required for purchase (approximately $45).

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3 Statistics):

Prerequisites: Form 6 NCEA Mathematics with Achievement Standards 2.6 (Algebra) and 2.12 (Probability).

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 70% in the final Form 6 Mathematics School examination (or Merits in the above Achievement Standards) have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 7 Statistics
  • Students averaging 40-70% in the final Form 6 Mathematics School examinations (or Achieved in the above Achievement Standards) and achieved above 50% or above in English should cope but may find aspects difficult
  • Students averaging less than 40% in Form 6 Mathematics School examinations and scored less than 50% in English may struggle and will be encouraged to do Mathematics – General next year

Course description/aims: A student taking this course should consider taking the Form 7 Mathematics with Calculus alongside. The course is not heavy in Algebra but will still give students the ability to achieve an NCEA Level 3 Mathematics Subject Endorsement. This course is intended for students moving on to university Engineering and Medicine Faculties next year but will cover key skills for other Faculties. The course will provide students with a solid base of mathematics with statistical skills for their tertiary mathematics education.

With the standards covered in this course, there is an expectation of good report writing skills.

The general aim of this course is to introduce and develop essential mathematical skills, concepts, and understandings in the Mathematical Processes, Number, Measurement, Algebra and Statistics curriculum strands to advance with mathematics the following year at a tertiary institution.  It is permissible for a student to do both Form 7 Mathematics with Calculus and Form 7 Statistics courses.

Course outline: The main areas of study are:

  • 3.2 – Linear Programming [3 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.8 – Time Series [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.10 – Inference [4 Credits, Internal]
  • 3.13 – Probability Concepts [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.14 – Probability Distributions [4 Credits, External]
  • 3.15 – Simultaneous Equations [3 Credits, Internal]

Methods of assessment: Class/common tests plus three School examinations in Terms 1, 2 and 3.

Special equipment and costs:

Scientific calculator or graphical calculator (a graphical calculator is highly recommended). Achievement Standard Workbooks may be required for purchase (approximately $45).

Form 7 (A2):

Prerequisites: Students must have gained passes in Cambridge AS (Pure Mathematics 1) and Cambridge AS (Statistics 1).

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students with A or B grades from Cambridge AS Mathematics have an appropriate achievement level to continue for a full A level qualification doing the Pure Mathematics (P3) and Statistics (S2) course
  • Students with C or D grades from Cambridge AS Mathematics may find aspects of Pure Mathematics (P3) and Statistics (S2) course difficult
  • Students with a D grade from Cambridge AS Mathematics will find aspects of the Pure Mathematics (P3) and Statistics (S2) course difficult and are recommended to do the Pure Mathematics (P3) and may be directed to do the Mechanics (M1) course
  • Students with a grade lower than a D will find A2 too difficult and should consider repeating Cambridge AS or opting for another subject

Course description/aims: The aim of the course is to introduce and develop a range of mathematical skills, particularly mathematics in context, and to develop an understanding of mathematical principles in the areas of Number, Measurement, Geometry, Algebra and Statistics curriculum strands.  

Course outline:

Pure Mathematics/Statistics course [P3 (Paper 3)/S2 course (Paper 6)]:

  • Algebra
  • Trigonometry
  • Calculus
  • Vectors
  • Complex numbers
  • Differential equations
  • Random variables
  • Distributions
  • Sampling
  • Estimation
  • Hypothesis testing

Pure Mathematics/Mechanics course [P3 (Paper 3)/M12 course (Paper 4)]:

  • Algebra
  • Trigonometry
  • Calculus
  • Vectors
  • Complex numbers
  • Numerical methods
  • Differential equations
  • Forces and equilibrium
  • Kinematics
  • Newton’s Law of Motion and Energy
  • Work and power

Methods of assessment: Common tests and three examinations in Terms 1, 2 and 3. Students presenting for Cambridge A2 Mathematics will be assessed on the basis of two external examinations:

  • Paper P3 9709/03 [1-hour 45 mins] / Paper S2 9709/07 [1 hour 15 min]
  • Paper P3 9709/03 [1-hour, 50 mins] / Paper M 9709/04 [1 hour 15 min]

Special equipment and costs: A scientific calculator of about Casio FX standard (Casio fx-991ES is recommended).

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Latin

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 and Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | NCEA Level 3

Introduction

The Latin Department at Auckland Grammar School is the largest in New Zealand and among the largest in the world. The Latin curriculum in Forms 5, 6 and 7 prepares students for the study of both Classical Studies and Latin in the senior school. Those students who choose to terminate their study after Form 4 can claim a linguistic legacy which will support their future studies.

The study of Latin is not entirely linguistic. Historical, geographical and sociological aspects are addressed. Formal grammar is rigorously taught which will both enhance the knowledge of English and allow easier access to the learning of European languages.

A project display hosted by the School Library has been a highlight for many years. Students create a raft of ancient Roman artefacts such as wax tablets, shields, mosaics and many other amazing things. The most original and well-executed projects are awarded ancient Roman coins as prizes.

Form 4

Prerequisites: Form 3 Latin.

Course description/aims: A complete coverage of Latin accidence (word forms); an introduction to the main areas of syntax (sentence patterns).

Course outline:

  • Students in 4A – 4D or those students who studied from the course books in Form 3 will continue with these books. Students taking the Auckland Grammar School course should take option 6 Latin if possible
  • Students in 4E – 4R or those students who studied from the Cambridge Latin Course will continue with this course if numbers allow. Students taking the Cambridge Latin Course course should take option 5 Latin if possible

Methods of assessment: Three school examinations per year. Course work marks are gained from tests, projects and assessments.

Continuation of subject: The subject is available at every level to Form 7 in at least one option line. Form 4 Latin provides a firm foundation for Form 5 Latin (and beyond).

Form 5 (NCEA Level 1 and Pre-Q):

Prerequisites: A background of two years’ studying the subject is essential for Form 5. It is important that students should already have been introduced to the passive, the subjunctive, and participles.

Course description/aims: It is intended that this course should lead into both Latin and Classics in the Senior School. This course has been tailored for those students who have a general interest in Roman History and who wish to develop their language awareness by learning formal grammar and by building up their Latin-based English vocabulary without having to acquire the listening and speaking skills of a modern language.

Course outline:

    • 1.1 – unseen translation with a full vocabulary list provided [External]
    • 1.2 – comprehension with a full vocabulary list provided [External]
    • 1.3 – study of Latin poetry, including selected poems of Martial and Catullus [Internal, assessed during the Term 2 and 3 examinations]
  • 1.6 – completion of a syntax course book on the Latin language [Internal, assessed over four tests during Terms 2 and 3]
  • There will also be an internal Pre-Q examination covering unseen translation, syntax, and the study of Caesar’s De Bello Gallico, at the end of Term 4

Continuation of subject: A full Latin option is available at Form 6 and Form 7 (NCEA Level 2 or Level 3 Latin). On the basis of our enriched NCEA Level 1 course, students will be able to return to NCEA Level 2 or 3, if they do not take Latin in Form 6.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Prerequisites: A background of three years’ studying the subject is essential for Form 6. It is important that students are already familiar with all tenses, moods and voices of regular and deponent verbs, all declensions of regular nouns, pronouns and adjectives, and elementary syntax.

Course outline:

    • 2.1 – unseen translation with a full vocabulary list provided [External]
    • 2.2 – comprehension with a full vocabulary list provided [External]
    • 2.3 – study of Latin prose and poetry, including Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Virgil’s Aeneid [Internal, assessed during the Term 3 examination]

  • 2.6 – completion of a syntax course book on the Latin language [Internal, assessed over four tests during Terms 2 and 3]

Continuation of subject: This course leads directly on to Form 7 Latin and also provides introductory experience for Form 7 Classical Studies.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: Form 5 and/or Form 6 Latin.

Course outline:

  • 3.1 – prose unseen translation with a full vocabulary list provided [External]
  • 3.2 – poet’s comprehension with a full vocabulary list provided [External]
  • 3.3 – study of Latin prose and poetry, including Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Virgil’s Aeneid [Internal, assessed during the Term 3 examination]
  • 3.6 – completion of a syntax course book on the Latin language [Internal, assessed over four tests during Terms 2 and 3]
  • Most students taking Latin in Form 7 will be expected to present for the NCEA Level 4 (NZQA Scholarship) Latin examination

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Japanese

Jump to: Form 3 | Form 4 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | NCEA Level 3 | AS Level

Introduction

Japanese at Auckland Grammar School has a long history and has been taught here for more than 40 years. It started as a relatively exotic subject with very small classes but later experienced a boom as the economic relationship with Japan became more significant. It has since stabilised and remains a potentially important subject for our pupils at an international level.

The department has a solid level of both academic and practical expertise in the subject. All members have lived in Japan at some time and bring a wealth of experience to their classes.

All students who study the language receive a sound foundation in the language and culture of Japan and our results in both NCEA and CIE qualifications are consistently excellent, making us one of the highest performing Japanese departments in the country. Our best students are sometimes able to gain direct entry to Stage 2 Japanese at university.

Form 3

Course description/aims: The Form 3 Japanese course has three principal aims:

  • To give a broad general introduction to Japan, and the language and culture of the Japanese people, as part of a student’s general education
  • To lay a solid foundation for continued study of the Japanese language
  • To emphasise simple, conversational Japanese useful in contact with Japanese people

Students will learn to understand simple spoken Japanese, and to speak in simple sentences in Japanese about a variety of topics. Students will learn everyday phrases and expressions which will be useful in any contact with Japanese people. Students will learn to read and write in simple Japanese script (Hiragana). The Form 3 course lays a very good foundation of grammar and vocabulary, mostly from the NCEA Level 1 syllabus.

Course outline:

  • Introductions and greetings
  • The Japanese writing system
  • The Japanese house
  • Telling the time
  • Sport and leisure
  • Daily life
  • Transport
  • Japanese food
  • The Japanese school system
  • Shopping
  • Describing what you are doing, describing people, etc.

Methods of assessment: Three examinations during the year plus two or three speaking tests.

Special equipment and costs: The course is contained in a textbook/workbook, produced at the School, which contains a comprehensive set of Japanese dialogues on everyday themes, grammar notes, vocabulary lists, learning exercises, Japanese dictionaries and cultural notes. Much of the work for the course is done in the workbook so that stationery costs for the course are kept to a minimum. It is necessary to levy a $45 charge for the workbook which will become a valuable, permanent resource for students.

Continuation of subject: Those who have made sufficient progress in Form 3 Japanese will be able to continue with Japanese through to Form 7. To proceed to Form 4, students MUST be able to read Hiragana script.

Form 4

The Form 4 course is intensive, which will very quickly develop your Japanese to a level far beyond that of Form 3 Japanese. It will introduce a substantial amount of new vocabulary, grammar and kanji. It will require you to be prepared to work hard throughout the year. As a reward for this hard work, students’ Japanese should quickly reach a high level, laying an excellent foundation for further study.

Prerequisites: students should have completed the Form 3 Japanese course at Auckland Grammar School. You MUST be able to read and write Hiragana script. If you have completed a Form 3 Japanese course at another school you will need to consult the Head of Japanese to determine whether you are sufficiently prepared for the Grammar course. Form 4 Japanese course is a comprehensive course which will take you close to NCEA Level 1 Japanese by the end of Form 4.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • 55% or more in Form 3 final examination should be able to cope with Form 4 Japanese
  • 45 – 55% in Form 3 final examination will find Form 4 Japanese very difficult
  • Less than 45% in the final Form 3 examination will find Form 4 Japanese extremely difficult and are not recommended to take Form 4 Japanese

Course description/aims: The broad aims of the course are to:

  • To give a broad general introduction to Japan and the language and culture of the Japanese people, as part of a student’s general education
  • To lay a solid foundation for continued study of the Japanese language
  • To emphasise everyday conversational Japanese, useful in contacts with Japanese people

The Form 4 course builds on the grammar and vocabulary of the Form 3 course. Students will:

  • Learn to understand and communicate more complex information
  • Learn how to function in Japanese society in a limited range of everyday situations
  • Learn more about Japanese geography, history, daily life and general cultural knowledge
  • Become fluent in the reading and writing of the Hiragana and Katakana script systems
  • Learn more than 100 Kanji characters

By the end of the year, Form 4 year students will have covered much of the NCEA Level 1 syllabus, giving a very good grounding on which to consolidate in Form 5.

Course outline:

  • Introducing yourself
  • Weather and the seasons
  • Shopping, home, family and daily life
  • Giving directions
  • Sport and leisure
  • Eating and drinking
  • Health
  • School
  • Travel and transport

Methods of assessment: Three exams during the year, plus a speaking test each term.

Special equipment and costs: The course is contained in a textbook and a series of workbooks. It is necessary to levy a $45 charge for the workbooks which will become a valuable, permanent resource for the student. As most work will be done in these workbooks, other stationery costs will be minimal.

Continuation of subject: Japanese is taught through to Form 7 (NCEA Level 3).

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and demanding course which assumes that students have already attained a good level of knowledge and skill in Japanese, and are able to fluently read and write Hiragana, Katakana and about 100 simple Kanji.

This course follows on from the Form 4 Japanese course, and assumes students have successfully completed the Form 4 Japanese course. The Form 5 course covers most of the work taught in Form 6 at other NZ schools. Students who have not successfully completed the Form 4 course MUST get permission from the Head of Japanese before enrolling in the Form 5 course.

Recommended achievement levels: Students who gain:

  • 60% or more in the final Form 4 examination should be able to cope with Form 5 Japanese
  • 50 – 60% or more in the final Form 4 examination should consult with the Head of Japanese before enrolling in Form 5 Japanese
  • Less than 50% in the final Form 4 examination are not recommended to enrol in Form 5 Japanese

Course description/aims: Three major topics are studied – family life, eating and drinking and school life. 

The course has two main aims:

  • To further develop the skills needed to function in a modern language (reading, writing, listening, and speaking); and 
  • To prepare students for advanced level courses in Form 6 and Form 7

Methods of assessment:

  • Three examinations testing reading and writing skills
  • Listening tests
  • Oral testing, including recorded speeches and oral interactions

Special equipment and costs: Part of the course is contained in a series of workbooks. It is necessary to levy a $20 charge for the workbooks which will become a valuable, permanent resource for the student. As much of the work will be done in these workbooks, other stationery costs will be minimal.

Continuation of subject: The Form 5 course will prepare students for further study at Form 6 level, which leads to Form 7 Japanese (NCEA Level 3).

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2 and AS):

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and demanding course which assumes that students have already attained a good level of knowledge and skill in Japanese and are able to fluently read and write Hiragana, Katakana and about 150 simple Kanji.

This course follows on from the Form 5 Japanese course, and assumes students have successfully completed the Form 5 Japanese course. The Form 6 course covers most of the work taught in Form 7 at other schools. Students who have not successfully completed Form 5 MUST get permission from the Head of Japanese before enrolling in the Form 6 course.

Recommended achievement levels: Students who gain:

  • 60% or more in the final Form 5 examination should be able to cope with Form 6 Japanese
  • 50 – 60% or more in the final Form 5 examination should consult with the Head pf Japanese before enrolling in the Form 6 course
  • Less than 50% in the final Form 5 examination are not recommended to enrol in Form 6 Japanese

Course outline: The Form 6 course is a single course of study which covers the needs of students in both NCEA and Cambridge pathways. While the content taught is largely similar, the methods of assessment will differ for the two pathways.

The course is based around the Getting There in Japanese series of textbooks, and three major topics are studied – sport and leisure, land and people, and travel and tourism.

The course has two main aims:

  1. To further develop the skills needed to use a modern language (reading, writing, listening, and speaking); and 
  2. To prepare students for advanced level courses (NCEA and university-level Japanese) in Form 7

Methods of assessments:

  • NCEA students will prepare for NCEA Level 2 internal and external assessments. All language skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) will be formally tested during the year. In Term 2 and Term 3, a number of NCEA Internal Assessments (oral and written) will be conducted. NCEA students will attempt all NCEA Level 2 assessments in Japanese (internal assessments and external assessments)
  • As there is no Cambridge external examinations in Japanese at Form 6, students following the Cambridge pathway will sit NCEA Japanese external assessments in Term 4

NCEA assessments:

  • Three examinations testing reading and writing skills.
  • Listening tests.
  • Oral testing, including recorded speeches and oral interactions

Continuation of subject: Form 6 Japanese leads to Form 7 Japanese (NCEA Level 3)

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: This course is an intensive and demanding course which assumes that students have already attained a good level of knowledge and skill in Japanese and are able to fluently read and write Hiragana, Katakana and about 200 simple Kanji.

This course follows on from the Form 6 Japanese course, and assumes students have successfully completed the Form 6 Japanese course. Students who have not successfully completed Form 6 Japanese MUST get permission from the Head of Japanese before enrolling in the Form 7 course.

Recommended achievement levels: Students who gain:

  • 60% or more in the final Form 6 examination should be able to cope with Form 6 Japanese
  • 50 – 60% or more in the final Form 6 examination should consult with the Head of Japanese before enrolling in the Form 6 course
  • Less than 50% in the final Form 6 examination are not recommended to enrol in Form 6 Japanese

Course description/aims: The NCEA Level 3 course is based around the Getting There in Japanese series of textbooks.

The major topics studied are land and people, travel and tourism, working life and communications. 

The course has two main aims:

  1. To further develop the skills needed to use a modern language (reading, writing, listening, speaking); and
  2. To prepare students for advanced level courses (NCEA Level 3 assessments)

Methods of assessment: NCEA students will prepare for both internal and external assessments.

All language skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking) will be formally tested during the year. In Term 2 and Term 3 a number of NCEA Internal Assessments (oral and written) will be conducted by:

  • Three examinations testing reading and writing skills
  • Listening tests
  • Oral testing, including recorded speeches and oral interactions

Form 7 (AS):

Prerequisites: Students who wish to study AS Japanese should have completed the Form 6 Japanese course at Auckland Grammar School. Those who have not must consult the Head of Japanese before opting for the AS course.

Course description: Topics covered include:

  • Everyday activities
  • Personal and social life
  • Education
  • The world around us, and the international world

Students are expected to use language that is considerably more advanced than that required for NCEA Level 3, and to use that language to discuss issues of much greater complexity. An extensive grammar list must be mastered. In addition, about 150 new kanji must be learned to add to approximately 200 learned by the end of Form 6.

Methods of assessment: The course is examined in November in three papers:

  • Speaking (prepared speech and conversation) (29%)
  • Reading and writing (50%)
  • Essay (21%)

There will be a practice speaking test [15-20 minutes in duration] each term, as part of the usual School examinations.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

History

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction – why study History?

History aims to stimulate an interest in and an enthusiasm for learning about the past. We want to ensure that students’ knowledge of contemporary society is grounded in an understanding of the past. In History, students read a range of source material, learning to interpret information with discrimination and insight.

Students develop their communication skills, learning to express themselves effectively for different purposes. Key historical concepts such as cause and consequence, change and continuity, and similarity and difference, as well as investigation, analysis and evaluation of source material, are developed.

History provides a broad foundation of knowledge and skills for a wide range of university courses and careers. History students become skilled at:

  1. Analysing large amounts of information, extracting the most relevant information, prioritising, assessing and constructing arguments. These skills are essential in careers such as law, administration, politics and government, TV research and journalism
  2. Enquiring and searching for information, knowing where to look and what questions to ask. These skills are essential in careers such as law and policing, investigative reporting, market research
  3. Communicating ideas in an organised, structured and logical fashion. History requires extended, logical, reasoned debate in writing. These skills are essential in careers that require writing reports, including academia, the civil service, law, and journalism
  4. Understanding individuals and groups – their feelings, attitudes, prejudices and motivations. These skills are essential in careers such as personnel, law, teaching, and social work.
  5. Understanding historical skills such as cause and consequence, change and continuity, which are essential in any career that requires analysis and strategy, such as the armed forces, teaching, advertising, medicine, banking and accountancy
  6. Developing skills of problem solving and evaluating solutions. The study of History teaches information handling, communicating ideas, flexibility and tolerance – skills that are essential in problem solving in industry and in research and development teams in science and engineering

Form 4 Social Sciences (Geography and History):

Prerequisites: None.

Course description/aims: Form 4 Geography and History are about how people in different environments, cultures, times, and places, think, feel, and act, how they organise their ways of life, interact with their environments, others, and initiate or respond to change. Four broad aims may be identified:

  1. Develop knowledge of the world and nation within which we live
  2. Promote thinking and understanding of how and why different cultures and individuals make, or have made, decisions to meet their needs
  3. Develop academic and social skills
  4. Create an ongoing interest in the Social Science disciplines of Geography and History

The Form 4 course introduces the senior Social Science subjects of Geography and History. Students get a taste of both subjects, study topics that have value in their own right and fulfil the requirements of the NZ National Curriculum. Where the timetable allows, this will involve classes being taught Geography and History by specialist teachers. Covering some Pre-Q content in Form 4 also allows those students who continue in these subjects more in-depth learning in Form 5.

Course outline: The Pre-Q Geography syllabus covers three themes as well as a geographic skills component:

  • The natural environment
  • Population and settlement
  • Development and use of resources

In Form 4, students cover elements of Theme 1 and Theme 2 in order to give them exposure to the physical and human sides of Geography. In addition, they will be exposed to a variety of geographic skills.

The topics covered are:

  • Plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes – the natural processes involved. Their effects and how people can prepare and cope with the consequences
  • Population change, the population explosion, youthful and ageing populations and their consequences. Government policies to influence birth rates. Resources in relation to population. Migration and the movement of people within and between countries
  • Coasts, the features and processes operating in coastal environments. This will include looking at how erosion, transportation and deposition, maintain a dynamic coastal environment
  • Geographic skills

The Pre-Q History syllabus covers the History of the 20th century through the lens of four key questions that seek to summarise international relations. In Form 4, students will learn about the history of World War I, the interwar years and the outbreak of World War II and New Zealand’s place in these histories. 

The topics covered are:

The First World War, 1914-1918

  • Key Question 1: Did one bullet cause the First World War?
  • Key Question 2: Why didn’t the strategy of attrition win the First World War?

International Relations, 1919-1939

  • Key Question 3: “The Diktat” How significant was the Treaty of Versailles?
  • Key Question 4: Could anything have stopped Hitler from causing the Second World War?

Methods of assessment: Every Form 4 student will complete a common test and or an examination at the end of every unit of work. In addition, individual teachers carry out book checks and tests for their classes. Examinations have Geography and History papers, employing questions that are designed to develop Pre-Q skills to support learning in Form 5.

Continuation of subject:  Form 4 Geography and History leads into Form 5 Pre-Q Geography and History and NCEA Level 1 Humanities.

Humanities – Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Prerequisites: This course is offered to students in 4P and 4R who will study a full NCEA Level 1 course in Form 5.

Course description/aims: The Form 5 Humanities programme includes Achievement Standards from History and Geography. All Standards earn credits towards NCEA Level 1, and all meet Literacy and/or Numeracy requirements for NCEA Level 1. The course aims to further develop knowledge and skills useful for History and Geography at Level 2.

Course outline: The course has seven Achievement Standards attempted during the year, from which students can acquire 25 credits: 17 from internal assessment and 8 from the two separate three-hour external examinations in History and Geography.

Methods of assessment: 

  • Geography 1.3 – Demonstrate geographic understanding of the sustainable use of an environment [3 credits, Internal]
  • Geography 1.4 – Apply concepts and basic geographic skills to demonstrate understanding of a given environment [4 credits, External]
  • Geography 1.6 – Describe aspects of a contemporary New Zealand geographic issue [3 credits, Internal]
  • Geography 1.7 – Describe aspects of a geographic topic at a global scale [3 credits, Internal]
  • History 1.2 – Demonstrate understanding of an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders [4 credits, Internal]
  • History 1.4 – Demonstrate understanding of different perspectives of people in an historical event of significance to New Zealanders [4 credits, Internal]
  • History 1.5 – Describe the causes and consequences of an historical event [4 credits, External]

Continuation of subject: This subject is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge required for entry to NCEA Level 2 Geography and NCEA Level 2 History in Form 6.

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for Form 5 Pre-Q History. Students will have completed the first half of the Pre-Q History course in Form 4.

Course description/aims:

  • Stimulate interest in and enthusiasm for learning about the past
  • Promote the acquisition of knowledge and understanding of individuals, people and the key features of societies in the past
  • Ensure that the learners’ knowledge is rooted in an understanding of chronology, and the nature, uses and limitations of historical evidence
  • Promote an understanding of key historical concepts: cause and consequence, change and continuity, similarity and difference, significance
  • Promote an understanding of key historical relationships: past and present, specific and general, patterns and trends
  • Promote an understanding of different perspectives of people in the past, and historians’ different interpretations of evidence about the past
  • Provide a sound basis for further study and the pursuit of personal interest
  • Encourage international understanding
  • Encourage the development of historical skills, including investigation, analysis, evaluation and communication skills

Course outline:

International Relations, 1939-c.2000: Survey Study

  • Why did the Allies win World War II?
  • How far was Stalin to blame for starting and spreading the Cold War?
  • ‘The closest the world has come to nuclear holocaust’: How effective was the USA’s policy of containment?
  • How did the USSR maintain control over Eastern Europe?
  • How far was Mikhail Gorbachev responsible for the end of the Cold War?

New Zealand, 1939-c.2000: Survey Study

  • Did New Zealand gain independence from one empire, only to join another?
  • Why did NZ reject the protection of the ‘nuclear umbrella’?
  • Why was New Zealand’s economic prosperity damaged after World War II?
  • How far did New Zealand society become fairer after World War II?
  • Who was the most significant New Zealander of the 20th century?

New Zealand Depth Study: Bastion Point

  • How did the New Zealand Government gain control over Orakei?
  • ‘Just another stunt’?: Why did Ngati Whatua members occupy Bastion Point in 1977-78?
  • How did the New Zealand Government justify its actions at Bastion Point in 1977-78?
  • What was the significance of the protests at Bastion Point?

Methods of assessment: School Examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination
  • 1 x 2-hour examination
  • 1 x 3-hour examination (Pre-Q)

Students may complete one NCEA Level 2 Achievement Standard worth four credits or complete an internally assessed component that contributes toward their final Pre-Q mark in History.

Assessment objectives:

  • Recall, select, organise, and deploy knowledge of syllabus content.
  • Construct historical explanations using an understanding of:
    • Cause and consequence, change and continuity, similarity and difference, significance
    • The perspectives (motives, emotions, intentions and beliefs) of people in the past
    • Historians’ interpretations of events in the past
  • Understand, interpret, evaluate and use a range of sources as evidence, in their historical context

Continuation of subject: Students will be able to opt for an AS Cambridge Level or an NCEA Level 2 course in Form 6.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Prerequisites: It is an advantage to have studied History in Form 5, but not essential.

Course description/aims: This course gives students an understanding of some of the major forces and events that have shaped the modern world. Topics have been selected for their interest and importance.

Students taking this course will:

  • Become familiar with important historical terms and ideas
  • Deepen their critical understanding of issues important to our nation
  • Increase their knowledge of human behaviour, and their understanding of different lifestyles and viewpoints
  • Observe how individuals and forces can influence the course of events.
  • Develop skills that will assist in further education and that will be useful in life beyond School
  • Develop historical research skills and the ability to communicate that research using different formats

While Form 6 History is a natural extension of the work done in Form 5 History, the course is a stand-alone, one-year programme which does not presuppose a study of History in other years.

Course outline: Topics to be studied will be selected from the following:

  • Why did the Industrial Revolution happen in Britain?
  • What were the effects of the Industrial Revolution?
  • What were the reasons for and effects of the Scramble for Africa? 
  • What were the reasons for and effects of imperialism in New Zealand? 
  • What were the reasons for and effects of New Zealand’s involvement in the First World?
  • What were the reasons for the rise in popularity of the Nazi Party in Germany?
  • What were the effects of the Nazis gaining power in Germany in 1933?
  • What were the reasons for American involvement in Vietnam?
  • What were the effects of American involvement in Vietnam?

Methods of assessment:

  • 2.2 – Examine an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders [Internal]
  • 2.3 – Examine sources of an historical event of significance to New Zealanders [External]
  • 2.4 – Interpret different perspectives of people in an historical event of significance to New Zealanders [Internal]
  • 2.5 – Examine causes and consequences of a significant historical event [External]
  • 2.6 – Examine how a significant historical event affected New Zealand society [External]

The external achievement standards are assessed in one paper at the end of the year. The internal achievement standards are assessed by a common assignment for each standard.

Continuation of subject: Courses are offered at Form 7 level. Students who do not opt for Form 6 History, particularly motivated students who have achieved sound marks in English, can successfully pick up History in Form 7.

Form 6 and 7 (AS):

Prerequisites: For Cambridge AS, it is an advantage to have studied History in Form 5. However, motivated students who have achieved sound marks in English can successfully pick up History as a Cambridge AS subject in Form 6. Furthermore, AS History can be picked up by motivated Form 7 students who have not studied History before.

Course description/aims: The Cambridge AS History syllabus aims to develop:

  • An interest in the past and an appreciation of human endeavour
  • A greater knowledge and understanding of historical periods or themes
  • A greater awareness of historical concepts such as cause an effect, similarity and difference, and change and continuity
  • An appreciation of the nature and diversity of historical sources available, and the methods used by historians
  • An exploration of a variety of approaches to different aspects of history and different interpretations of particular historical issues
  • The ability to think independently and make informed judgements on issues
  • An empathy with people living in different places and at different times
  • A firm foundation for further study of History

Course outline: The topics to be studied will be selected from the following options:

  • European option: Modern Europe, 1750-1921
  • American option: The history of the USA, 1820-1941
  • International option: International history, 1870-1945

Assessment objectives: Candidates will be expected to:

  • Recall, select and deploy historical knowledge appropriately and effectively
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the past through explanation, analysis and a substantiated judgement of key concepts: causation, consequence, continuity, change and significance within an historical context, the relationships between key features and characteristics of the periods studied
  • Analyse, evaluate and interpret a range of appropriate source material
  • Analyse and evaluate how aspects of the past have been interpreted and represented.

Methods of assessment: Students will sit two examinations: 

  • Paper 1: 1 hour 15 mins examination: 40% of Cambridge AS History. Source-based questions on a topic selected from a depth study. The examination will test Assessment Objectives 1 and 3
  • Paper 2: 1 hour 45 mins examination: 60% of Cambridge AS History. Essay questions on course content. The examination will test assessment objective course content (Assessment Objectives 1 and 2

Note: There is no internally-assessed course work in the Cambridge syllabus.

Continuation of subject: A full A Level History course is available, or students may opt to undertake other AS Level courses in Form 7.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: It is an advantage to have studied History in Form 5 and/or Form 6. However, motivated students who have achieved sound marks in English can successfully pick up History as a new subject in Form 7.

Course description/aims: The Form 7 History course recognises the growing maturity of students and requires them to explore issues with more historical insight than at earlier levels. The course:

  • Will deal with more demanding historical problems
  • Requires students to develop more extended, informed and convincing arguments
  • Offers students the opportunity to work with source materials and to acquire an understanding of the historian’s craft
  • Demands a higher level of reading, writing, thinking, knowledge and understanding than at Forms 5 and 6

In particular the Form 7 course aims to:

  • Develop students’ understanding of Historical concepts
  • Develop student’s ability to write well-developed points supported by detailed evidence
  • Develop in students a critical approach to historical sources by exposing them to the varying interpretations and debates (historiography) that result from historical study

Course outline:

  • Understand that the causes, consequences, and explanations of historical events that are of significance to New Zealanders are complex and how and why they are contested.
  • Understand how trends over time reflect social, economic, and political forces.

Major topics that could be studied:

  • Tudor Stuart England, 1558-1667
  • New Zealand in the 19th century
  • The causes of the US Civil War and its consequences
  • The origins and effects of World War II
  • Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust
  • The origins and development of the Cold War

Methods of assessment:

  • 3.2 – Analyse a historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders [Internal]
  • 3.3 – Analyse evidence relating to an historical event of significance to New Zealanders [External]
  • 3.4 – Analyse different perspectives of a contested event of significance to New Zealanders [Internal]
  • 3.5 – Analyse the causes and consequences of a significant historical event [External]
  • 3.6 – Analyse a significant historical trend and the force(s) that influenced it [External]

Form 7 (AS / A2):

Prerequisites:

  • Students who gain an A to a good D grade in Cambridge AS History will be admitted to this course.
  • Students who gain a low D grade in Cambridge AS History must consult with the Head of History to enter this course
  • Students who gain an E grade or Ungraded result in AS History will not be able to enter this course

Course description/aims: The aims below are designed to set out the educational purposes of a course in Cambridge AS History. The aims are to develop:

  • An interest in the past and an appreciation of human endeavour
  • A greater knowledge and understanding of historical periods or themes
  • A greater awareness of historical concepts such as cause and effect, similarity and difference, and change and continuity
  • An appreciation of the nature and diversity of historical sources available, and the methods used by historians
  • An exploration of a variety of approaches to different aspects of history and different interpretations of particular historical issues
  • The ability to think independently and make informed judgements on issues
  • An empathy with people living in different places at different times
  • A firm foundation for further study of History

Assessment objectives: Candidates will be expected to:

  • Recall, select and deploy historical knowledge appropriately and effectively
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the past through explanation, analysis and a substantiated judgement of key concepts: causation, consequence, continuity, change and significance within an historical context, the relationships between key features and characteristics of the periods studied
  • Analyse, evaluate and interpret a range of appropriate source material
  • Analyse and evaluate how aspects of the past have been interpreted and represented

Course outline: At Cambridge A Level, there are two units. The topic to be studied for Unit 3 will be The origins and development of the Cold War. The topics to be studied for Unit 4 will be selected from the following options:

  • European option, Depth study 1: European history in the interwar years, 1919-1941
    • Theme 1: Mussolini’s Italy, 1919-1941
    • Theme 2: Stalin’s Russia, 1924-1941
    • Theme 3: Hitler’s Germany, 1929-1941
    • Theme 4: Britain, 1919-1939
  • International option, Depth study 3: International history, 1945-1992
    • Theme 1: US-Soviet relations during the Cold War, 1950-1991
    • Theme 2: The spread of communism in East and Southeast Asia, 1945-1991
    • Theme 3: Decolonisation, the Cold War and the UN in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1950-1992
    • Theme 4: Conflict in the Middle East, 1948-1991

Methods of assessment: Students’ Cambridge AS marks make up 50% of the Cambridge A Level grade. The remaining 50% is assessed in two examinations at the end of the Cambridge A Level course:

  • Paper 3: 1¼-hour examination: 20% of Cambridge A Level History. Source-based question on an historian’s approach to the selected Unit 3 topic. The examination will test Assessment Objectives 1 and 4
  • Paper 4: 1¾-hour examination. Essay questions on the selected Unit 4 content. 30% of Cambridge A Level History. The examination will test Assessment Objective 1 and 2

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Geography

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

Geography is a valuable conjoint with such subjects as law, commerce, planning, valuation, and architecture and can broadly be defined as ‘the study of the earth as the home of people.

From a geographer’s perspective, the world can be viewed as being composed of two interacting environments, the human (cultural) environment and the natural (physical) environment. Geographers set out to describe and explain the characteristics of, and the processes operating within, each of these environments as well as the interactions that take place between them.

Studies in geography can cover a great variety of areas, such as hydrology, coastal processes, biogeography, environmental science, climatology, meteorology, geophysics, geology, botany, population studies, planning, tourism, settlement studies, economic systems, transportation, sociology, anthropology, development studies, land-use studies, and geomorphology.

Form 4 Social Sciences (Geography and History):

Prerequisites: None.

Course description/aims: Form 4 Geography and History are about how people in different environments, cultures, times, and places, think, feel, and act, how they organise their ways of life, interact with their environments, others, and initiate or respond to change. Four broad aims may be identified:

  1. Develop knowledge of the world and nation within which we live
  2. Promote thinking and understanding of how and why different cultures and individuals make, or have made, decisions to meet their needs
  3. Develop academic and social skills
  4. Create an ongoing interest in the Social Science disciplines of Geography and History

The Form 4 course introduces the senior Social Science subjects of Geography and History. Students get a taste of both subjects, study topics that have value in their own right and fulfil the requirements of the NZ National Curriculum. Where the timetable allows, this will involve classes being taught Geography and History by specialist teachers. Covering some Pre-Q content in Form 4 also allows those students who continue in these subjects more in-depth learning in Form 5.

Course outline: The Pre-Q Geography syllabus covers three themes as well as a geographic skills component:

  • The natural environment
  • Population and settlement
  • Development and use of resources

In Form 4, students cover elements of Theme 1 and Theme 2 in order to give them exposure to the physical and human sides of Geography. In addition, they will be exposed to a variety of geographic skills.

The topics covered are:

  • Plate tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes – the natural processes involved. Their effects and how people can prepare and cope with the consequences
  • Population change, the population explosion, youthful and ageing populations and their consequences. Government policies to influence birth rates. Resources in relation to population. Migration and the movement of people within and between countries
  • Coasts, the features and processes operating in coastal environments. This will include looking at how erosion, transportation and deposition, maintain a dynamic coastal environment
  • Geographic skills

The Pre-Q History syllabus covers the History of the 20th century through the lens of four key questions that seek to summarise international relations. In Form 4, students will learn about the history of World War I, the interwar years and the outbreak of World War II and New Zealand’s place in these histories. 

The topics covered are:

The First World War, 1914-1918

  • Key Question 1: Did one bullet cause the First World War?
  • Key Question 2: Why didn’t the strategy of attrition win the First World War?

International Relations, 1919-1939

  • Key Question 3: “The Diktat” How significant was the Treaty of Versailles?
  • Key Question 4: Could anything have stopped Hitler from causing the Second World War?

Methods of assessment: Every Form 4 student will complete a common test and or an examination at the end of every unit of work. In addition, individual teachers carry out book checks and tests for their classes. Examinations have Geography and History papers, employing questions that are designed to develop Pre-Q skills to support learning in Form 5.

Continuation of subject: Form 4 Geography and History leads into Form 5 Pre-Q Geography and History and NCEA Level 1 Humanities.

Humanities – Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Prerequisites: This course is offered to students in 4P and 4R who will study a full NCEA Level 1 course in Form 5.

Course description/aims: The Form 5 Humanities programme includes Achievement Standards from History and Geography. All Standards earn credits towards NCEA Level 1, and all meet Literacy and/or Numeracy requirements for NCEA Level 1. The course aims to further develop knowledge and skills useful for History and Geography at Level 2.

Course outline: The course has seven Achievement Standards attempted during the year, from which students can acquire 25 credits: 17 from internal assessment and 8 from the two separate three-hour external examinations in History and Geography.

Methods of assessment: 

    • Geography 1.3 – Demonstrate geographic understanding of the sustainable use of an environment [3 credits, Internal]
    • Geography 1.4 – Apply concepts and basic geographic skills to demonstrate understanding of a given environment [4 credits, External]
    • Geography 1.6 – Describe aspects of a contemporary New Zealand geographic issue [3 credits, Internal]
    • Geography 1.7 – Describe aspects of a geographic topic at a global scale [3 credits, Internal]

  • History 1.2 – Demonstrate understanding of an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders [4 credits, Internal]
  • History 1.4 – Demonstrate understanding of different perspectives of people in an historical event of significance to New Zealanders [4 credits, Internal]
  • History 1.5 – Describe the causes and consequences of an historical event [4 credits, External]

Continuation of subject: This subject is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge required for entry to NCEA Level 2 Geography and NCEA Level 2 History in Form 6.

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Prerequisites: None. Students have already completed approximately 18 weeks of the Form 5 Pre-Q Geography course while in Form 4. It should be noted that this work will not be re-taught in Form 5, but will be included in the final Pre-Q examination.

Course description/aims: The Form 5 Pre-Q Geography curriculum is divided into three themes, which are collectively designed to develop an understanding of both the natural and human environment:

  • Population and Settlement: examines why and how populations change and different settlement patterns form
  • The Natural Environment: examines a wide variety of processes shaping the landscape. These include tectonic processes, weathering, river, glacial and wind processes, coastal processes, climate and vegetation environments
  • Development: covers a range of topics from agricultural and industrial systems through to variations in economic development between countries

Geographic skills and various methods of depicting geographical information (e.g. topographic mapping, graphs and models) are also covered in the course.

Methods of assessment: School examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 4 (Pre-Q)

Special equipment/costs: Students are required to provide their own Geography equipment. It should include a 30cm ruler, colouring pencils, glue stick, scissors, pencil sharpener, pens. Students may be required to contribute to any field trip bus costs.

Continuation of subject: Cambridge courses are offered at Form 6 (AS) and Form 7 (A2) levels. Students should note that NCEA Geography courses are also offered at Forms 6 and 7.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Prerequisites: Form 6 NCEA Geography extends upon the ideas and concepts developed in Form 5 Pre-Q NCEA Geography or Level 1 Humanities, but it can be picked up by students who did not study either of these Form 5 courses.

Course description/aims: Geography aims to develop an understanding of the environment as the home of people. This involves studying the characteristics and processes of both the Natural and Cultural environments of New Zealand and other parts of the world. The course also develops a wide range of thinking, practical, valuing and social skills.

Course outline:

  • 2.1 – Demonstrate geographic understanding of a large natural environment (eg: Amazon Basin, South Island High Country) [4 credits, External]
  • 2.2 – Demonstrate geographic understanding of an urban pattern [3 credits, Internal]
  • 2.3 – Demonstrate geographic understanding of differences in development [4 credits, External]
  • 2.4 – Apply geographic concepts and skills to demonstrate geographic understanding of a given environment [4 credits, External]
  • 2.5 – Conduct geographic research with guidance [5 credits, Internal]
  • 2.6 – Explain aspects of a contemporary New Zealand geographic issue [3 credits, Internal]
  • 2.7 – Explain aspects of a geographic topic at a global scale [3 credits]

Special equipment/costs: Students are required to provide their own Geography equipment. Students may be required to contribute to any field trip bus costs.

Continuation of subject: NCEA Level 3 classes are offered at Form 7.

Form 6 (AS):

Prerequisites: Form 6 Cambridge AS Geography builds upon the ideas and concepts developed in the Form 5 Pre-Q course, but can be picked up by students who did not study this course. Students should note that Form 6 Cambridge (AS) Geography is an academically rigorous course and is a step-up from the Form 5 Pre-Q course. Students with a mark lower than 60% in the Pre-Q Examination should consult with Mr Maguire or Mr Easingwood. Students should only consider taking this subject if their marks and work ethic are very sound.

Course description/aims: The Form 6 Cambridge AS Geography curriculum is designed to develop an understanding of both the natural and human environments.  Students are required to study three themes from the Physical Geography section and two from the Human Geography section.

Physical Geography themes:

  • Hydrology and Fluvial Geomorphology: examines the processes operating in river drainage systems and the various landforms created. Human interactions and modifications are also explored
  • Rocks and Weathering: looks at the different processes influencing, and responsible for, weathering and slope development. The nature of weathering processes in rocks of differing chemical composition and structure, and in different environments, are examined
  • Atmosphere and Weather: examines the energy flows that drive the earth’s weather and climate systems. Atmospheric moisture, precipitation, air stability and resulting weather phenomena are studied. The human impact, for example, global warming, greenhouse effect and urban climate is explored

Human Geography themes:

  • Population Change: looks at the components of population change, its management, and the relationships between population and resources
  • Migration: looks at migration as a component of population change – both internal and international
  • Settlement Dynamics: examines settlement hierarchies and the factors that affect them. Urban trends and issues in Lower Income Countries and Higher Income Countries are studied

Methods of assessment: The Cambridge AS Geography course is assessed by two 90-minute external examinations (one for the Physical Geography topics and one for the Human Geography topics). If a student continues with Geography at the Cambridge A2 Form 7 level, then the examinations sat at Cambridge AS Form 6 will contribute 50% of their final A Level mark.

Special equipment/costs: Students are required to provide their own Geography equipment. Students may be required to contribute to any field trip bus costs.

Continuation of subject: Geography offers a Cambridge A2 level course in Form 7, which enables students to complete Cambridge A Levels in this subject.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: Form 7 NCEA Geography extends upon the ideas and concepts developed in Form 5 and Form 6 NCEA Geography, but can be picked up by students who did not study the Form 5 or Form 6 course. Students who did not study Geography at Form 6 must be willing to take the time to study the NCEA Geography concepts at the outset of this course.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 55% in Form 6 School Geography and/or English examinations have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 7 (NCEA Level 3) Geography.
  • Students averaging 45- 55% in Form 6 School Geography and/or English examinations may find Form 7 (NCEA Level 3) Geography difficult, especially if they did not take Geography in Forms 5 or 6
  • Students averaging under 45% in Form 6 School Geography and/or English examinations are not recommended to take Form 7 (NCEA Level 3) Geography

Course description/aims: Geography aims to develop an understanding of the environment as the home of people. In Form 7, this involves studying a particular natural environment within New Zealand, and an aspect of the cultural environment of New Zealand and a global concept. The course also develops a wide range of thinking, practical, valuing and social skills, and has a particular emphasis on the role played by Geography in planning and decision-making.

Course outline:

  • 3.1 – Demonstrate understanding of how interacting processes shape a New Zealand geographic environment [4 credits, External]
  • 3.2 – Demonstrate understanding of how a cultural process shapes geographic environment(s) [4 credits, External]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate understanding of a given environment(s) through the selection and application of geographic concepts and skills [4 credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Conduct geographic research with consultation [5 credits, Internal]
  • 3.6 – Analyse aspects of a contemporary geographic issue [3 credits, Internal]
  • 3.7 – Analyse aspects of a geographic topic at a global scale [3 credits, Internal]

Special equipment/costs: Students are required to provide their own Geography equipment. Students may be required to contribute to any field trip bus costs.

Continuation of subject: Geography is taught in both Arts and Science Faculties at Auckland University, as part of the School of Environment. Geography is also a valuable conjoint subject with Law, Commerce, Planning or Valuation Degrees.

Form 7 (A2):

Prerequisites: Form 7 Cambridge A2 Geography builds upon the ideas and concepts developed in the Form 6 Cambridge AS course.

  • Students who gain an A to a good D grade in Cambridge AS Geography will be admitted to this course
  • Students who gain a low D grade in Cambridge AS Geography must consult with the HOD Geography to enter this course
  • Students who gain an E grade or ungraded result in Cambridge AS Geography will not be able to enter this course

Course description/aims: The Cambridge A2 Geography curriculum is designed to develop an understanding of both the natural and human environments. Students are required to select two options from the Physical Geography section and two from the Human Geography section.

Physical Geography options:

  • Tropical Environments: climates, ecosystems, landforms, sustainable management
  • Coastal Environments: wave and marine processes, coastal landforms, coral reefs, sustainable management
  • Hazardous Environments: crustal movements, mass movements, atmospheric disturbance, sustainable management
  • Arid and Semi-Arid Environments: distribution and characteristics, processes producing desert landforms, soils and vegetation, sustainable management

Human Geography options:

  • Production, Location and Change: agricultural systems and food production, management of agricultural change, manufacturing and related service industry, management of industrial change
  • Environmental Management sustainable energy supplies, management of energy supplies, environmental degradation, management
  • Economic Transition: national development, globalisation, regional development, management
  • Global Interdependence: international trade; international tourism

Methods of assessment: Students sit two examination papers totalling three hours – one paper covering Physical Geography and one covering Human Geography. These examinations make up 50% of the Cambridge A Level Geography qualification, the other 50% coming from the Cambridge AS Level examination sat in Form 6.

Special equipment/costs: Students are required to provide their own Geography equipment. Students may be required to contribute to any field trip bus costs.

Continuation of subject: Geography is taught in both Arts and Science Faculties at Auckland University, and as part of the School of Environment.  Geography is also a valuable conjoint subject with Law, Commerce, Planning or Valuation Degrees.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today– 

French

Jump to: Form 4 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 and AS Level | NCEA Level 3 and A2 Level

Introduction

French is offered as a beginners’ course in Form 3 and can be studied through to NCEA and Cambridge International Examination A2 level following Grammar’s dual pathway policy.

All French classes are streamed according to their ability in French based on their results in the reclassification examination. This policy continues right through to Form 7 whenever there is more than one class at a particular level. French is taught at a beginner level to all Form 3 students in Term 1; from Term 2, there are two separate examinations to cater for different ability levels.

As much learning as possible takes place in French. After five years of learning French, students should expect not only to give a good account of himself in his everyday dealings in a French-speaking country but also be able to read widely in French and discuss a range of major issues with French-speaking people.

Form 4:

Prerequisites: Form 3 French.

Course description/aims: The course aims to further develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in French to enable students to communicate with confidence in a variety of everyday situations.

Students will also learn about the life and customs of the people of France and other countries of the French-speaking world. At the end of the course students will have a solid grasp of the vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation of the French language which will enable them to continue learning French in Form 5.

Course outline: Students regularly practise the four language skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening). Topics covered include: travelling to and in France, holidays in France, family life, jobs, school life, shopping, food and drink, health, cafés and restaurants, going out and arranging to meet.

Methods of assessment: At the end of Terms 1, 2 and 4, students will sit examinations lasting between one and two hours. All examinations test the skills of listening, reading and writing. The Term 2 and Term 4 examinations also contain a speaking mark. In Term 3, students will sit a common test and will be tested on their speaking as well. There are also common tests at regular intervals during the terms to assess progress in the four skills.

Special equipment/costs: Education Perfect, as well as a workbook, are compulsory for all Form 4 students for $55. The internationally-recognised DELF examination is an optional assessment for students which is assessed externally. The A2 Level best corresponds to Form 4 students. It is $65 and is usually sat at the end of August

Continuation of subject: French may be studied to NCEA Level 3 and Cambridge A Level.

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Prerequisites: Form 4 French.

Course description/aims: The course builds further on the skills of oral and written communication and is highly practical with students learning to use French to enable them to cope in a variety of everyday situations.

Course outline: With the main grammatical structures of French having been dealt with in Forms 3 and 4, the Form 5 course is one of consolidation and reinforcement of the skills learnt during the previous years.

The topics studied will enable students not only to talk about aspects of their own life (personal details, family, description, leisure interests, housing, schooling and daily routine), but also equip them with language necessary for coping in a French-speaking environment (holidays, travel, shopping, eating and drinking, health and communications). The students will also develop beginner knowledge in French literature.

Methods of assessment: There will be three School examinations, each assessing the skills of listening, reading and writing and a speaking examination in Term 3.

  • 1 x 1-hour examination
  • 1 x 2-hour examination
  • 1 x 3-hour examination (Pre-Q)

Special equipment/costs: Education Perfect is compulsory for all levels for $20. The internationally-recognised DELF examination is an optional assessment for students which is assessed externally. The B1 level best corresponds to Form 5 students. It is $80 and is usually sat at the end of August.

Continuation of subject: All students may continue their study of French as far as NCEA Level 3 or Cambridge A Level.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2 and AS):

Prerequisites:

  • AS entry requires a minimum of 70% at Pre-Q
  • NCEA Level 2 requires a minimum of 65% at Pre-Q

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 65% in Form 5 French have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 6 French
  • Students averaging 45-65% in Form 5 French may find Form 6 French difficult
  • Students averaging under 45% in Form 5 French are not recommended to take Form 6 French

Course description/aims: The course aims to build further on the skills of oral and written communication by dealing with the more complex structures and wider vocabulary which will enable students to express their opinions in French on a wide variety of subjects of interest to young people.

They will be able to develop highly practical skills designed to help them cope with a range of situations they might encounter when travelling in French speaking countries. Students also develop close reading and paraphrasing skills.

Course outline: Students will be able to opt for either NCEA Level 2 or the Cambridge AS examination. A range of topics are covered in both courses, including but not limited to, health and well-being, leisure, latest trends, talking about future plans, and relationships. AS French topics are changed annually, but fall within the broad categories of relationships, work and leisure, war and peace, medical advances, and the environment.

Methods of assessment: Students who opt for NCEA Level 2 will be able to gain credits in the five NCEA Achievement Standards internally-assessed over the course of the year: two speaking assessments (a prepared talk and interactions) and two assessments to test students’ ability to write French with resources. Achievement Standards in Listening and Reading will be externally-assessed at the end of the year.

Students who opt to sit the Cambridge AS examination at the end of the year will sit a Reading and Writing paper and an Essay paper. They will also sit a speaking test (consisting of an oral presentation, a topic (prepared) conversation and a general conversation) as part of this examination.

Special equipment/costs: Education Perfect is compulsory for all levels for $20 The internationally-recognised DELF examination is an optional assessment for students which is assessed externally. The B1 level best corresponds to Form 6 students. It is $80 and is usually sat at the end of August.

Continuation of subject: French may be studied to NCEA Level 3 and Cambridge A Level.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3 and A Level):

Prerequisites: Form 6 French.

Recommended achievement levels:

  • Students averaging over 65% in Form 6 French have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 7 French
  • Students averaging 45-65% in Form 6 French may find Form 7 French difficult
  • Students averaging under 45% in Form 6 French are not recommended to take Form 7 French

Course description/aims: The course aims to build further on the skills of oral and written communication by dealing with more complex structures and wider vocabulary which will enable students to express their opinions in French on a wide variety of subjects of interest to young people. Students also develop close reading and paraphrasing skills.

Course outline: Students will opt for either NCEA Level 3 French or the A Level examination. Students who have already obtained a good pass in AS may opt for the A Level course in which an additional element is the study of French literature.

A range of topics are studied including for NCEA Level 3 a region of France, getting a job, the creative arts, environmental issues, social cohesion in France and the French-speaking world and media. For A Level French, topics are changed annually but fall within the broad categories of relationships, work and leisure, war and peace, medical advances and the environment.

Methods of assessment: There will be five NCEA Achievement Standards internally-assessed over the course of the year: two speaking assessments (a prepared talk and interactions) and three assessments to test students’ ability to write French with resources. Achievement Standards in Listening and Reading will be externally-assessed at the end of the year.

Students who opt to sit the Cambridge A Level examination at the end of the year will sit a Reading and Writing paper, an Essay paper, and a Literature paper involving the study of three prescribed works of French Literature. They will also sit a speaking test (consisting of an oral presentation, a topic (prepared) conversation and a general conversation) as part of this examination.

Special equipment/costs: Education Perfect is compulsory for all levels for $20. The internationally-recognised DELF examination is an optional assessment for students which is assessed externally. The B2 level best corresponds to Form 7 students. It is $80 and is usually sat at the end of August.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

ESOL

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 | NCEA Level 2 | NCEA Level 3

Introduction

The ESOL Department assists students who have non-English speaking backgrounds. The specialist staff teach the English language needed for achievement across all curriculum areas.

Senior classes enable students to gain literacy credits for NCEA Level 1, and Level 2 University Literacy Credits in English. The classes for Forms 5 and 6 enable achievement of similar standards to mainstream English, but there is also support for academic vocabulary development and understanding of grammatical rules.

Form 4

Prerequisites: Form 3 English Language (ESOL).

Course description/aims: The Form 4 English Language (ESOL) programme will continue the cross-curricular English language support given in Form 3. The focus of the programme is on developing fluency and accuracy in English. Grammar is systematically taught together with listening, speaking, reading and writing genres relevant to curriculum areas.

Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Prerequisites: Students are selected for English Language (ESOL) classes on the basis of their Form 4 English results and referrals.

Course description/aims: The Form 5 English programme aims to further develop fluency in listening, speaking, writing and reading in English. It also gives targeted support in grammar and language development.

Course outline: The course will be based on the following NCEA Level 1 Achievement Standards:

  • 1.1 – Show understanding of written texts [External]
  • 1.2 – Show understanding of visual texts [External]
  • 1.5 – Produce formal writing [Internal]
  • 1.6 – Oral presentation [Internal]
  • 1.8 – Explain significant connections across texts [Internal]
  • 1.9 – Use information literacy skills [Internal]
  • 1.10 – Personal response to independently read texts [Internal]

There will be flexibility in tailoring programmes for different students. English Language Unit Standards may be utilised where appropriate.

Methods of assessment: There will be opportunities to gain credits over the year from internally-assessed standards. Practice for the external standards will be gained in the School examinations.

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 3

Continuation of subject: Students, after consultation, may continue to Form 6 English Language (ESOL) or enter a mainstream Form 6 English class in the following year.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Prerequisites: Students are selected for ESOL classes on the basis of their Form 5 English Language results. This course is also available to selected Cambridge students wishing to gain University Entrance Literacy.

Course description/aims: The Form 6 English Language programme will use both Achievement and Unit Standards that earn credits towards NCEA Level 2. The course aims to further develop fluency in listening, speaking, reading and writing in English. Special attention is given to developing skills needed for academic study at university level.

Course outline:

One-year programme: This course will provide ample opportunity for gaining the necessary credits for University Entrance Literacy:

  • 2.1 – Analyse written texts [4 credits, External]
  • 2.2 – Analyse visual texts [4 credits, External]
  • 2.4 – Produce crafted writing [6 credits, Internal]
  • 2.5 – Construct and deliver an oral text [3 credits, Internal]
  • 2.8 – Use information literacy skills [4 credits, Internal]
  • 2.9 – Personal response to independently read texts [4 credits, Internal]

Two-year programme: The two-year Form 6 programme is designed for Form 6 students who may need an extra year to achieve University Entrance Literacy. In the first year, the course focuses on scaffolding the skills needed for reading, writing, listening and speaking. Suitable unit standards are offered in these areas, leading to University Entrance Literacy credits. In the second year, students may join the Form 7 programme to complete Level 2 Literacy Units.

Continuation of subject: Students, after consultation, may continue to Form 7 ESOL or enter a mainstream Form 7 English class in the following year.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: Students are selected on the basis of their Form 6 English Language results. This is a continuation of the 2-year Form 6 English Language course, although new Form 7 NCEA students can be admitted after consultation with the Head of ESOL.

Course description/aims: English for Academic Purposes: this class is offered to both International and Permanent Resident ESOL students who need to achieve University Entrance Literacy standards and/or require some Level 3 English qualifications taught through ESL methodology.

The course also develops English language skills in academic vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, listening and speaking in order to prepare students for tertiary courses. Some Level 2 or 3 English externals may be offered on an individual student basis.

N.B. This course cannot be used as an approved Level 3 NCEA subject for University Entrance requirements.

Course outline:

Reading:

  • English Level 2 A/S 2.8 * – Use information literacy skills [4 credits]
  • English Level 2 A/S 2.9 * – Form developed personal responses [4 credits]
  • English Level 3 A/S 3.1 * – Respond critically to specified aspect(s) of studied written text(s) [4 credits]
  • EAP Level 4 22751* – Read and process information in English for an academic purpose [6 credits]
  • EL US Level 3 30996 – Read and understand complex text in applied context [5 credits]
  • EL US Level 3 30997 – Read and understand a text on a familiar topic [5 credits]

Writing:

  • EAP Level 4 22749* – Write a text under test conditions in English for an academic purpose [5 credits]
  • EAP Level 4 22750* – Write crafted text using researched material in English for an academic purpose [6 credits]
  • EL US Level 3 28068 – Write a connected text on a familiar topic [5 credits]
  • EL US Level 3 28070 – Write a response for a specific purpose [5 credits]
  • English Level 2 A/S 2.4 * – Produce crafted and controlled writing [6 credits]
  • English Level 3 A/S 3.1* – Respond critically to specified aspect(s) of studied written text(s) [4 credits]
  • English Level 3 A/S 3.2* – Respond critically to specified aspect(s) of studied visual or oral text(s) [4 credits]

Speaking: English A/S Level 3 3.5 Construct and deliver an oral text [3 credits]

* University Entrance Literacy Standard (English NCEA Level 2 or 3)

IELTS: Practice and formative assessments for the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) will form part of the course work. These skills will be transferable to any academic course of tertiary study. Students who wish to enter this examination, however, must do so through an official external testing centre such as a language school at a local university.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

English

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | Literacy (NCEA Level 1) | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

With a diverse range of personalities, the English department continues to inspire students in the study of literature, language, reading, speaking and writing. A range of different courses and qualifications are offered to suit students of all ability levels.

Form 4:

Course description/aims: All Form 4 students will study the same, general course that covers a range of skills that build upon the Form 3 programme. The programme is designed to introduce students to the skills required at the next level, whether it be NCEA Level 1 or Pre-Q.

Work covered includes:

Literature: Poetry, Film and Drama will be taught, along with the teacher’s choice of Non-Fiction or Novel. Elements of style, structure, character, setting and theme will be analysed and students will respond by writing transactional essays. Students will also study literary eras and movements.

Language of the Writer’s Craft: Students will continue to study the use and effect of writing techniques, including narrative point of view, figures of speech, sound devices and methods of characterisation.

Film: Film techniques (camera, lighting, sound and editing) will be revisited, in conjunction with a study of a film as text.

Writing: Students will write in a variety of different creative and transactional styles: narrative, descriptive and discursive/argumentative.

Static Images: This study will examine the use of visual texts for communication. The use of images, colour, contrast, lettering and layout will be incorporated into the design and production of a book cover.

Speaking: Public speaking and reading aloud in a formal setting are part of the programme.

Comprehension: Students will continue to be given the task of reading written, oral and visual unfamiliar texts, often tied to the focal topic of the term, and will need to answer questions that test or enhance their ability to comprehend basic, as well as inferential questions.

Language: Students will continue their study of basic grammar (parts of speech, punctuation, syntax, paragraphing, and spelling) from the department grammar booklet that all Form 3 students receive.

Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Course outline: The Form 5 NCEA Level 1 English course is based upon selected internally-assessed and externally-assessed Achievement Standards as follows:

  • 1.4 – Creative Writing [3 credits, Internal]
  • 1.5 – Formal Writing [3 credits, Internal]
  • 1.6 – Speech [3 credits, Internal]
  • Written Text – novel or non-fiction [4 credits, External]
  • Visual Text – film [4 credits, External]
  • Unfamiliar Written Texts [4 credits, External]

Methods of assessment: There will be several Achievement Standards offered during the year, from which students can acquire 21 credits: nine from internal assessment and 12 from the three-hour external examination.

Students will also sit School examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 3

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Course outline: Students will study one novel, one drama, and one film. These will be tested by essay under examination conditions. Students will also study the writer’s craft and be tested, under examination conditions, on their reading comprehension.

A speech and a formal argumentative piece of writing are included in course work, while a study of a selection of biblical and classical allusions commonly referenced in literature is also undertaken.

Methods of assessment: All papers are compulsory:

  • Paper 1: Reading Comprehension (course work component)
  • Paper 2: Novel essay
  • Paper 3: Drama essay
  • Paper 4: Film essay

School examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2 (includes Paper 2 component – 25% of Pre-Q)
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 4 (Papers 1, 3, and 4 – 75% of Pre-Q)

Literacy – Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Prerequisites: This course is designed for students from 4P and 4R and it provides students who need additional support in reading and writing the opportunity to improve their literacy skills.

Course descriptions/aims: The course will provide direct teaching in reading and writing. The aim is to improve students’ literacy skills so they can manage the demands of study in the Senior School in a variety of curriculum areas. The course provides additional credits towards the literacy requirements for NCEA Level 1.

Work covered includes:

Visual Language: Explain how aspects of visual texts work together to create meaning.

Writing Accurately: Paragraphing, punctuation and spelling, sentence structure and control, and eliminating patterns of error.

Writing Strategies:

  • How to write creatively (narrative and descriptive stories)
  • How to write formally (formal personal correspondence)
  • Personalised next steps to develop each student’s writing skills

Improving Reading Comprehension and Fluency:

  • Instruction in Reading Comprehension strategies
  • Vocabulary development
  • Participation in the reading plus programme

Methods of assessment: This course is internally assessed through the completion of NCEA Level 1 Unit and/or Achievement Standards: AS90853, AS90856, AS90855, US10792, and US24731 (18 credits).

Form 6:

Prerequisites: Form 6 students will be streamed on English ability, based on their Form 5 Pre-Q examination results or NCEA Level 1 results, and will study either Cambridge AS Literature, Cambridge AS Literature and Language, or NCEA Level 2 English. 

Entry into Cambridge English is entirely at the discretion of the Head of Faculty. As a general guide, AS Literature is taken – and achievable – by students in 6A to 6I.

Students who gain a scaled mark between 40% and 45% in Pre-Q, will likely be placed in AS Language and Literature, which is a one-year only course that does not continue to A2. There are also a limited number of places available in this class for students who wish to opt in.

Some students in 6C to 6I students might be placed in NCEA Level 2 English, if their scaled Pre-Q mark is under 40%.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Methods of assessment: There will be six Achievement Standards. Students can acquire 25 credits: 13 from internal assessment and 12 from the external examination.

    • 2.1 – Analyse specified aspects of studied written texts, with supporting evidence [4 credits, External]
    • 2.2 – Analyse specified aspects of studied visual or oral texts, with supporting evidence [4 credits, External]

  • 2.3 – Analyse significant aspects of unfamiliar texts through close reading with supporting evidence [4 credits, External]
  • 2.4 – Produce a selection of crafted and controlled writing [6 credits, Internal]
  • 2.5 – Construct and deliver a crafted and controlled oral text [3 credits, Internal]
  • 2.9 – Form developed personal responses to independently read texts, supported by evidence [4 credits, Internal]

Form 6 (AS Literature):

Methods of assessment: This literature-only programme is examined externally at the end of the year as a stand-alone course or as the first half of a two-year course (the second being A Level (A2) Literature). Students will present for two external examinations at the end of the year:

  • Paper 1: Drama and Poetry [2 hours] – two essays (50% mark)
  • Paper 2: Prose and Unseen Texts [2 hours] – two essays (50% mark)

Form 6 (AS Literature and Language):

One class only of this stand-alone course is offered to students (subject to marks gained in Pre-Q) who are NOT going to do English in Form 7 as it does not carry through to A Level. 

There is a little less time pressure in this course as two literature texts are studied (instead of four with AS Literature). The language component comprises writing in a variety of creative (narrative and descriptive) and formal (discursive and persuasive) styles.

Methods of assessment:

  • Paper 1: Writing [2 hours] – two pieces of writing (50% mark)
  • Paper 2: Poetry, Prose and Drama [2 hours] – two literature essays (50% mark)

Form 7:

Prerequisites: Form 7 students will be streamed according to their English ability, based on their AS Literature or NCEA Level 2 results and will present for A Level (A2) Literature or NCEA Level 3 English. Students may enter the NZQA Scholarship examination and while no specific class will be run for this, tutorials will be run in Terms 3 and 4.

Entry to Cambridge A2 Literature is recommended to those students who have achieved 55% or better in AS Literature. An AS Literature C Grade or at least a good D is preferable. Students who achieve between 50% and 55% will be considered for this course on a case-by-case basis by the Head of English.

Note that students who took the AS Language and Literature course are not eligible to take this course.

Assessments will be conducted throughout the year in the internal School examinations at the end of Terms 1, 2 and 3 to provide students with meaningful feedback on their level of achievement.

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Prerequisites: The NCEA Level 3 English course is significantly more difficult than Level 2 and only students with a very good English skills base should consider opting for it. 

A minimum of 10 reading and writing credits at Level 2 (i.e. not counting the speech) including one external standard are expected of students wanting to enter NCEA Level 3 English. For example, the following would qualify:

  • the Level 2 writing internal plus at least one Level 2 external 
  • the Level 2 reading internal plus at least two Level 2 externals

Methods of assessment: Six Achievement Standards worth 22 credits are on offer from internal and external assessment as follows:

    • 3.1 – Written text (poetry, short story, novel, drama or non-fiction study) [4 credits, External]

  • 3.2 – Film text study [4 credits, External]
  • 3.3 – Respond critically to unfamiliar prose and poetry texts [4 credits, External]
  • 3.5 – Create and deliver an oral presentation [3 credits, Internal]
  • 3.8 – Develop a critical understanding of literature [4 credits, Internal]
  • 3.9 – Respond critically to visual texts [3 credits, Internal]

Form 7 (A2 Literature):

This course is an extension of the same literature-only programme where students present for two external examinations at the end of the year.

Methods of assessment:

  • Paper 3: Shakespeare and drama [2 hours] – two literature essays (50% mark)
  • Paper 4: Pre- and Post-1900 poetry and prose [2 hours] – two literature essays (50% mark)

Those students who had difficulty with AS Literature may opt to study NCEA Level 3.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Economics

Jump to: Form 4 | NCEA Level 1 | Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

Economics at Auckland Grammar School is offered through the dual pathway of NCEA and CIE. Students enter a course of study based on their results from Forms 3 and 4. In general, CIE courses require a greater depth of knowledge and ability with written expression than the corresponding NCEA Level.

In Form 4, students have the option to choose an introduction to Economics and Business Studies (EBS) that covers a wide variety of topics. In Form 5, students can study Economics at Pre-Q level, then at the senior levels,   students cover the three main macro-economic issues; inflation, international trade and economic growth. Others theories covered include micro-economic market theory, market failure and measurement in the macro-economy.

In Form 7, students can choose to take the final level of both CIE and NCEA. NCEA Level 3 covers market theory, the behaviour of firms, market failure and aggregate (macro) economic activity. The A2 course, the most difficult economics course offered at the school, offers papers covering the theory of the firm, labour markets, government intervention, macro-economics and development economics.

Form 4 (Business Studies / Economics / Accounting)

This course is an introduction to some of the basic concepts in Business, Economics and Accounting. It is not a pre-requisite for study at Form 5, but will help students interested in Commerce make a more informed decision about subjects to study in Form 5.

Course description/aims: Topics covered in economics include the basic economic problem, introductory micro economic analysis including market theory (demand and supply), consumer economics including financial literacy topics such as insurance, budgeting and consumer rights and obligations in the market place. Students also complete a unit on Business Studies, covering some of the main issues such as marketing, business organisation, business success and failure. There is also a unit on Business Accounting and a business management simulation.

Economics/Consumer Financial Literacy

  • Basic economic problem: scarcity and exercise of choice
  • What, how and for whom
  • Economic systems

Market Equilibrium – Demand, Supply, Equilibrium

Financial Literacy Part 1

  • Income
  • Credit
  • Saving
  • Personal budgeting
  • Financial Records and ID Theft

Business Studies

  • Why business activity is needed
  • How business activity is organised and financed
  • How to start a business
  • Business objectives

Accounting for Sole Traders

  • Financial information
  • Accounting equation
  • Debits and Credits
  • Transactions and Trial Balance
  • Income Statement
  • Assets and Liabilities
  • Trading Statement
  • Statement of Financial Position
  • Accounting Cycle
  • Accounting Analysis

Financial Literacy Part 2 – Consumer Laws and Insurance

Business Marketing

  • Market Segments
  • Market Research
  • Marketing Mix – the 4 P’s

Methods of Assessment:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 4

Special equipment/costs: None

Continuation of course: This course will provide good background and preparation for Accounting, Business Studies and Economics.

Commerce – Form 5 (NCEA Level 1):

Pre-requisites: None, although it is an advantage to have studied Accounting/Business Studies (4ABS) or Economics/Business Studies (4EBS) in Form 4. This course is for students in 4P and 4R in 2021 who will study a full NCEA course at Form 5.

Course description/aims: This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and theories covered in the Commerce subjects of Economics, Business Studies and Accounting. The course aims to give students a basic understanding of:

  • Microeconomics: market theory (demand and supply), scarcity and exercise of choice in economic decision-making
  • Macroeconomics: sectors of the economy, money flow, and interdependence between households, producers, government and other sectors
  • Business marketing and success and failure of businesses
  • The principles and purposes of accounting for individuals and businesses and making a financial decision

Successful completion of this course provides an appropriate base for study of Accounting, Business Studies or Economics at NCEA Level 2 in Form 6.

Course outline: The proposed course outline is designed to cover the following NCEA Level 1 Achievement Standards:

Economics:

  • 90983 – Demonstrate understanding of consumer choices, using scarcity and/or demand [4 credits, External]
  • 90985 – Demonstrate understanding of producer choices using supply [3 credits, External]
  • 90988 – Demonstrate understanding of the interdependence of sectors of the New Zealand economy [3 credits, Internal]

Business Studies: 90840 – Apply the marketing mix to a new or existing product [3 credits, Internal]

Accounting: 90981 – Make a financial decision for an individual or group [3 credits, Internal]

Methods of Assessment: Students complete a mix of NCEA Level 1 internally-assessed and externally-assessed Achievement Standards (as in the Course Outline above). Students will also be assessed by in-class tests and the School examinations which take place in Terms 1, 2 and 4.

Continuation of subject: Successful completion of this course provides an appropriate base for study of Accounting, Business Studies or Economics at NCEA Level 2 in Form 6.

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Course description/aims: The course is a wide-ranging economics programme that introduces students to a variety of theory, topics and issues domestically and internationally. The course is designed with the NZ economy as a base, together with international comparisons. The aims of the Pre-Q course are to develop:

  • Knowledge and understanding of economic theory
  • An ability to interpret data in a variety of forms
  • An understanding of the NZ economy in a global context
  • An ability to apply economic skills and analysis in particular situations
  • An ability to distinguish between facts and value judgements in economic issues

Course outline:

  • Introductory Concepts
  • How Markets Work and Why Markets Fail
  • Money, Exchange and Labour
  • The Theory of the Firm
  • The Government and Central Authorities
  • Macroeconomic Indicators
  • Global Inequality
  • International Economics

Methods of assessment:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 4 (Pre-Q) – candidates answer 20 multiple choice questions (weighted at 20% of total available marks). Candidates answer one compulsory question, which requires them to interpret and analyse previously unseen data relevant to a real economic situation (weighted 20% of total available marks), and three optional questions worth 20 marks each from a choice of six (weighted at 60% of total available marks).

Continuation of subject: Successful completion of Pre-Q Economics provides an excellent base for further study at both Cambridge AS and NCEA Level 2. It is also a very useful foundation for study at both Cambridge A2 and NCEA Level 3.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Course description/aims: The content of this course is mainly macroeconomics and covers the major macroeconomic issues of: employment, inflation, international trade and sustainable economic growth. Students are taught a variety of economic models and are introduced to common economic statistics and data relating to these topics.

Course outline: The course is divided into equal sections – each topic covers the definition, measurement, causes and effects of the issue. New Zealand’s recent historical record in each area is studied together with projections for the future

NCEA Level 2 Achievement Standards cover:

  • 2.1 – Analyse inflation using economic concepts and models [4 credits, External]
  • 2.2 – Analyse international trade using economic concepts and models [4 credits, External]
  • 2.3 – Analyse economic growth using economic concepts and models [4 credits, External]
  • 2.4 – Analyse unemployment using economic concepts and models [4 credits, Internal]
  • 2.5 – Analyse statistical data relating to contemporary economic issues [4 credits, Internal]

Methods of assessment: A total of 12 credits will be assessed by an external three-hour examination and a further eight credits will be assessed by 2 internally-assessed assignments.

School examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1 (internal assessment)
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 3

Continuation of subject: Successful completion of this course is an advantage for Level 3 Economics.

Form 6 (AS):

Pre-requisites: None. It is an advantage to have studied Economics in Form 5, but not essential. New students to Economics can, with appropriate motivation, realistically attempt AS Economics.

Course description/aims: This course generates marks for the first half of Advanced Level Economics and is correspondingly weighted at 50% (as well as being a course in its own right).

The course covers an introduction to Economics, basic economic concepts and models; an extensive analysis of the market system (demand and supply); issues regarding market failure and the role of the government in attempting to correct market failure; macroeconomic measurement and problems including inflation, unemployment and international trade.

Course outline:

  • The basic economic problem
  • The price system
  • Government intervention in the price system
  • Measurement in the macro economy
  • International trade
  • Exchange rate theory
  • Government policy for balance of payments disequilibrium and influencing the exchange rate

Methods of assessment: Paper 1 [1 hour] comprising thirty multi-choice questions and Paper 2 [1 hour, 30 minutes] comprising one compulsory data response question and a choice of one essay (in two parts) from three.

School examination:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
  • 1 x 2.5-hour examination – end of Term 3

Class assessments: Common tests are held each term and multiple choice tests; data response questions and essays are also set regularly throughout the year.

Special equipment and costs: $15 revision website subscription (highly recommended).

Continuation of subject: A ‘good’ grade D or better allows for direct entry into A2 Economics. However, a ‘low’ grade D requires HOD approval and a grade E or U candidate is unable to attempt A2 (but could consider retaking AS).

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Pre-requisites: None. It is an advantage to have studied Economics in Form 5 and/or Form 6, but not essential. Although the course starts from first principles, new students to Economics must be prepared to work very hard on basic concepts and terminology as content is recovered from Level 1 and 2 relatively quickly.

Course description/aims: This course covers a variety of topics in microeconomics, public economics and macroeconomics. A number of economics models and theories are covered and current economic issues are used to help explain theory.

Course outline:

  • 3.1 – Demonstrate understanding of the efficiency of market equilibrium [4 credits, External]
  • 3.3 – Demonstrate understanding of micro-economic concepts [5 credits, Internal]
  • 3.4 – Demonstrate understanding of government interventions to correct market failure [5 credits, Internal]
  • 3.5 – Demonstrate understanding of macro-economic influences on the New Zealand economy [6 credits, External]

Methods of assessment: Students sit a three-hour external examination assessing four Achievement Standards worth 14 credits.

School examination:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1 (internal assessment)
  • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2 (internal assessment)
  • 1 x 3-hour examination – end of Term 3

Special equipment/costs: A workbook for $20.

Form 7 (A2):

Pre-requisites:

  • Students who gain an A to a good D grade in AS Economics will be admitted to this course. A genuine interest in Economics as well as a willingness and ability to accept the greater workload and difficulty involved is essential. Students with an AS mark of 70% or less are strongly encouraged to re-sit AS in the May/June session
  • Students who gain a low D grade in AS Economics must consult with the Head of Economics to enter this course
  • Students who gain an E grade or Ungraded result in AS Economics will not be accepted into this course.

Course description/aims: A2 is a relatively demanding economics extension course that involves a detailed study of micro and macroeconomics. Students are encouraged to read widely around topics under review and are expected to develop excellent written communication skills. Essays are very important at this level and require comprehensive knowledge and application of relevant theory and models, together with superior evaluation and analysis skills.

Course outline:

  • Detailed theory of the firm
  • Labour market theory
  • Government intervention in the price system
  • Advanced macroeconomic studies
  • Development Economics theory and issues

Methods of assessment:

  • External examination: Cambridge International Examination Assessment is in two papers
    • Paper 3 [1-hour] comprising 30 very technical and detailed multi-choice questions
    • Paper 4 [2-hour 15 mins] comprising one compulsory data response question and two 25-mark essays from a choice of six
  • NZQA Level 4 Scholarship – Successful completion of the A2 course is excellent preparation for this optional three-hour examination, held late in Term 4
  • School examination:
    • 1 x 1-hour examination – end of Term 1
    • 1 x 2-hour examination – end of Term 2
    • 1 x 3-hour 15 mins examination – end of Term 3
  • Class assessment: Common tests are held each term and multiple choice tests; data response questions and essays are also set regularly throughout the year

Special equipment and costs: $15 revision website subscription (highly recommended).

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.

Classics

Jump to: Pre-Q | NCEA Level 2 | AS Level | NCEA Level 3 | A2 Level

Introduction

Classics may be defined as the study of ancient Greece and Rome, without the study of the classical languages Greek and Latin. Students gain an in-depth knowledge of important aspects of both Greek and Roman civilisation, and an understanding of their formative and enduring influence on the rich cultural tradition of Western Europe. The subject combines elements of several disciplines: literature, ancient history, art history and philosophy.

What is the value of Classics?

Classics is a subject of significant intrinsic merit and also teaches invaluable analytical and written skills which are crucial in today’s world. 

Classics introduces us to the high points of Western civilisation and allows us to examine some of the greatest works of the human intellect and creative genius. We walk in the footsteps of countless generations who have learned to navigate the future more confidently by reflecting on the past. Classics teaches students to think analytically and independently. It also helps students to improve and develop their written skills. No matter what aspirations you have for the future, no matter what professional or career path you choose to follow, you will need to be able to think, speak and write clearly, logically and critically.

Classics not only opens our eyes to the outstanding achievements of the ancient world, enriching us personally and taking us to a world beyond our immediate and daily concerns, but also helps us to develop and hone skills that are crucial for both future study and professional life.

Is Classics for you?

If you are interested in the humanities, and enjoy subjects like History, English, Languages, Music and the Arts, you may like to consider Classics.  Humanities subjects provide excellent preparation for students thinking about careers in law, politics, government, diplomacy, academia, teaching, journalism, publishing, the media and communications, and in any of the creative professions.

If you are thinking of studying Latin at senior levels, then you should definitely think about taking Classics as well.  Latin and Classics are an excellent fit.  Latin will enable you to focus on the language and literary aspects of original Latin texts, while Classics will give you the wider historical, social, political, artistic and literary background, and enable you to read Greek and Latin texts in translation.  Latin students who take Classics as well, will also gain an insight into the civilisation of ancient Greece which underpins and influences so much of Roman literary and artistic achievement.  Some of our top scholars in recent years have studied both Latin and Classics.

If you are thinking of embarking on a mainly scientific or commerce pathway, with a view to a career in medicine, engineering, technology or business, do not underestimate the value of taking at least one, or perhaps two, subjects at some point in the Senior School that will encourage you to step outside your comfort zone. Classics will introduce you to a very rich, invigorating and fascinating world beyond the perimeters of a strictly professional or career focussed course.

A more holistic approach to learning at school is likely to be more beneficial to you, both personally and in your chosen profession, than you may envisage at this point.  Many successful doctors, scientists, engineers, and businessmen among our Old Boys speak of the significant advantages gained from including a subject like Classics among their subject choices in their final years at school.

Form 5 (Pre-Q):

Recommended Achievement Levels: Students averaging over 60% in Form 4 English examinations or 50% in Latin have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 5 Classics. Students who do not fulfil this recommended achievement level should apply to the Head of Classics to discuss admission to the course on a case-by-case basis.

Description: The course is open to all students, whether they intend to follow a Cambridge or NCEA pathway in the Senior School.

The course will provide an excellent foundation for students wishing to study EITHER AS/A2 Classics or NCEA Levels 2 and 3 Classics, but will also be a valuable introduction to the ancient worlds of Greece and Rome for those interested in taking the subject for one year only.

Students will still be able to take up AS/A Level Classics and NCEA Levels 2 and 3 without taking Classics in Form 5, although students interested in taking the subject at higher levels are encouraged to take it from Form 5.

Course Outline: The Form 5 course will introduce students to the civilisations of both ancient Greece and Rome. The course content may vary from year to year but will generally include the following areas of study:

  • Myths and legends, gods and heroes, drawn from the literature and art of both Greece and Rome, with a focus on the Roman poet Ovid’s witty tales of transformation in his entertaining epic poem Metamorphoses
  • Conflict, crisis and the quest for personal power in the final years of the Roman republic (including the role of the Roman legions and the careers of Pompey the Great and the most famous Roman of them all – Julius Caesar)
  • The contrasting worlds of 5th century BC Athens and Sparta, set against the background of the Persian Wars, 490-479BC (including the Battles of Marathon, Thermopylae and Salamis)
  • Selected examples of the awe-inspiring artistic and architectural wonders of the classical world with a focus on Roman architecture
  • An introduction to Greek Science, Medicine and Philosophy, including the pre-Socratic physical philosophers/first scientists, as well as Socrates, Plato and Aristotle

Methods of Assessment: School Examinations:

  • 1 x 1-hour examination
  • 1 x 2-hour examination
  • 1 x 3-hour examination (Pre-Q)

The Form 5 course, in terms of content and focus, is specifically designed with Auckland Grammar students in mind. Form 5 Classics leads seamlessly on to our Cambridge (AS/A Level) and/or NCEA courses in Forms 6 and 7. The Form 5 course will be assessed by a written examination.

Continuation of Classical Studies: Upon completion of the Form 5 course, students may opt to take either AS or NCEA Level 2 Classics (depending on their individual assessment pathway), if they continue with Classics in Form 6.

Form 6 (NCEA Level 2):

Recommended Achievement Levels: Students averaging over 60% in Form 5 Classics, English or History examinations, or over 50% in Latin, have an appropriate achievement level to study Form 6 Classics. Students who do not fulfil this achievement level should apply to the Head of Classics to discuss admission to the course on a case-by-case basis.

Description: Students will explore a range of topics within the perimeters of the achievement standards set out below. At present, topics include Homer’s Odyssey, the Political and Social Life of ancient Rome in the time of Julius Caesar and the Art of Pompeii and Herculaneum. We also examine the life and career of the most famous Roman of them all, Julius Caesar. From time to time specific topics may vary. Students will be advised of any topic changes on a timely basis.

Course Outline: The course currently comprises the following Level 2 achievement standards:

  • 2.1: Examine ideas and values of the classical world – Homer’s Odyssey [4 credits, External]
  • 2.2: Examine the significance of features of work(s) of art in the classical world – Pompeii and Herculaneum [4 credits, External]
  • 2.3: Demonstrate understanding of a significant event in the classical world – the death of Julius Caesar [4 credits, Internal]
  • 2.4: Examine socio-political life in the classical world – Roman social and political life in the age of Julius Caesar [6 credits, External]
  • 2.5: Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between aspects of the classical world and other cultures – the comparison of Homer’s Odyssey with modern film interpretation [6 credits, Internal]

Methods of Assessment: Form 6 Classics will be assessed through a combination of two internally-assessed and three externally-examined NCEA Level 2 achievement standards, making a total of 24 credits.

Continuation of Classical Studies: Upon completion of Form 6, students may opt to take NCEA Level 3 Classics.

Form 6 and 7 (AS):

Recommended Achievement Levels: Students averaging over 60% in Form 5 Pre-Q Classics, Form 5 Pre-Q and/or Form 6 English or History examinations, or over 50% in Latin at those levels, have an appropriate achievement level to study Cambridge AS Classics. Students who do not fulfil this achievement level should apply to the Head of Classics for admission to the course on a case-by-case basis.

Description: We explore in depth one Greek and one Roman topic.

The Greek topic invites us to explore the life and career of Alexander the Great. Born in 356BC, Alexander became king of Macedonia at just under 20 years of age. Within 10 years of crossing from Europe into Asia, he brought the rule of the mighty Persian Empire to an end, and became king, however briefly, of the lands from Greece to India. Alexander’s conquest spread Greek culture far and wide, and ushered in the Hellenistic Age that endured for over 300 years until the death of Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt, herself a descendant of one of Alexander’s own generals.

The Roman topic transports us to a crucial period in Roman history, the last years of the First Century BC. The death of Julius Caesar signals the death of the republic. With the rise to power of Augustus, we witnessed the beginnings of the empire. The greatest of the Roman poets, Virgil, a contemporary and friend of Augustus, imbues his story of the Trojan hero, Aeneas, father of the Roman people, with universal themes that have resonated deeply with audiences from Virgil’s own day to our own. 

The course offers an excellent introduction to high points of both Greek and Roman civilisation and provides a superb foundation for Cambridge A2 Level Classics.

Course Outline: The course comprises the following two papers:

  • Paper 1: Greek Civilisation (Alexander the Great). This topic focuses on the life and career of Alexander the Great as seen through the eyes of his biographers. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the main events of Alexander’s life, successes and relationships, with a focus on his impact and his legacy. This topic will develop students’ historical analysis skill, requiring them to offer critical evaluation of Alexander’s life, his career and successes in context. Students will study a selection of biographical works and other sources with particular reference to Alexander’s family, childhood and upbringing; campaigns and travels; military achievements and reasons for them; rule of his empire and Persian influences; relationships with others; attitude towards religion and mythology; personal and imperial legacy
  • Paper 2: Roman Civilisation (Virgil’s Aeneid): Virgil’s Aeneid holds a premier position in the canon of Roman literature. This topic provides students with the opportunity to consider both the inspiration Virgil drew from Homer and the influence of Virgil’s own cultural and political context on his portrayal of what it was to be a Roman hero in the Roman world. This topic will develop students’ literary analysis and appreciation skills, requiring them to offer critical analysis of, and personal response to, Virgil’s Aeneid. This will include the religious, cultural and social values reflected in the Aeneid, including the changing concept of heroism; the role and importance of family, women, gods and goddesses, fate and destiny; and the historical and political context in which the poem was written, including the theme of Rome’s mission, and the extent to which Augustus, his regime and the Roman empire are promoted within the epic

Methods of Assessment:

  • Paper 1: Greek Civilisation (Alexander the Great). 1 x examination (1 hour, 30 mins, 50 marks). Candidates answer two questions, one compulsory structured question (25 marks) and one out of a choice of two essay questions (25 marks) – this paper is externally-assessed (50% of AS Level)
  • Paper 2: Roman Civilisation (Virgil’s Aeneid ). 1 x examination (1 hour, 30 mins, 50 marks). Candidates answer two questions, one compulsory structured question (25 marks) and one out of a choice of two essay questions (25 marks) – this paper is externally-assessed (50% of AS Level)

Continuation of Classical Studies: Upon completion of the AS course, students may opt to take Classics at Cambridge A2 Level. 

Form 7 (NCEA Level 3):

Recommended Achievement Levels: Students averaging over 60% in Form 6 Classics, English or History examinations, have an appropriate achievement level to study Level 3 Classics. Students who do not fulfil this achievement level should apply to the Head of Classics to discuss admission to the course on a case-by-case basis.

Description: Students will explore a range of topics within the parameters of the achievement standards set out below.

Topics include the career and achievements of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus. We focus on his rise to power and revolutionary transformation of Rome into an empire, by ruthlessly employing all the means at his disposal: civil war, violence and intimidation, bribery, political office, propaganda – even his own family and friends.

We also study some of the greatest works of Roman architectural and engineering genius, including the Colosseum, the Pont du Gard and the Pantheon; and we meet many of the major Roman gods and goddesses in Virgil’s epic masterpiece the Aeneid, which tells the story of the Trojan hero Aeneas who flees from Troy to find a new home in Italy and becomes the father of the Roman people.

Course Outline: The course comprises the following Level 3 Achievement Standards:

  • 3.1: Analyse ideas and values of the classical world – Virgil’s Aeneid [4 credits, External]
  • 3.2: Analyse the significance of work(s) of art in the classical world – Roman Art and Architecture [4 credits, External]
  • 3.3: Analyse the impact of a significant historical figure on the classical world – Augustus [6 credits, External]
  • 3.4: Demonstrate understanding of significant ideology(ies) in the classical world – Political messages through Roman Art and Architecture [6 credits, Internal]
  • 3.5: Demonstrate understanding of the lasting influences of the classical world on other cultures across time – Experience of War [6 credits, Internal]

Methods of Assessment: NCEA Level 3 will be assessed through two internally-assessed and three externally-examined NCEA Level 3 achievement standards, providing a total of 26 credits.

Form 7 (A2):

Prerequisites: AS Classics.

Recommended Achievement Levels: Students who gain an A to a good D grade in AS Classics will be admitted to this course. Students who do not fulfil this achievement level should apply to the Head of Classics to discuss admission to the course on a case-by-case basis.

Description: A2 Classics gives students the opportunity to go deeper in discovering and uncovering the riches of the ancient world through the critical analysis and interpretation of its literary texts, studied in their own contemporary contexts. The course of study progresses naturally from the topics studied in the AS Classics course. The texts studied will range from epic poetry to ancient biographies and histories, and students will be expected to read widely around the topics, in addition to the primary and secondary set texts.

Course Outline: The course comprises the following two papers:

  • Paper 3: Classical History (Athens and Sparta). This topic focuses on the history of the fifth century BC as seen through the eyes of the authors of the period and later. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the main events of the period (499-404BC). This topic will develop students’ historical analysis skills, requiring them to offer critical evaluation of the impact of the historical events in this period on the people of Athens and Sparta and the contribution of people of different status living in these communities. Students will study a selection of historical, biographical and other sources with particular reference to: the roles of men, women and non-citizens in Athens and Sparta; political systems, functions of different groups within these systems and the influence of individuals on events; the reasons for, impacts and outcomes of the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars; alliances with other states; and the relationship between the state and outsiders
  • Paper 4: Greek Literature (Homeric Epic). The epic poems of Homer were considered by the Greeks to be a foundation of Greek culture, being the earliest surviving literature. This topic provides students with the opportunity to study both the Iliad and the Odyssey. Students will gain an understanding of: the historical and mythological background of the poems; the oral nature of composition and transmission of the poems, later written down, but containing traces of earlier societies and culture. This topic will develop students’ literary analysis and appreciation skills, requiring them to offer critical analysis of, and personal response to, the literary achievements of Homer and the religious, cultural and social values reflected in the poems. Content will include literary techniques; significant themes and the depiction of the Homeric world; the nature of the Homeric hero; characterisation of other characters, including gods and goddesses, and their role and importance in the epics; the role and importance of omens and prophecies, fate and destiny

Methods of Assessments:

  • Paper 3 – Classical History (Athens and Sparta): 1 x examination (1 hour, 30 mins, 50 marks). Candidates answer two questions: one compulsory source-based question (20 marks) and one out of a choice of two essay questions (30 marks) – this paper is externally assessed (25% of A Level)
  • Paper 4 – Greek Literature (Homeric Epic): 1 x examination (1 hour, 30 mins , 50 marks). Candidates answer two questions, one compulsory source-based question (20 marks) and one out of a choice of two essay questions (30 marks) – this paper is externally assessed (25% of A Level)

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our staff today.